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B & W
framing suggestion:
This grand old beast used to ply the Yukon river on the run to Dawson for the Klondike
goldfields, supplying food, booze, floozies, you name it, to keep the gold diggers happy (or at
least not quite so miserable, given the dire straits most of them were in). Now run up onto
the hard standing at Whitehorse, capital of Yukon Territory and not even a half-way stage on
the gruelling march to the goldfields, the ‘Klondike’ has been a target for arsonists and
vandals ever since. I'm not even sure if she's still there (it was a good thirty years since I saw
her, and I recall that I later saw a news item that two such sternwheelers had both been
destroyed by fire, but I can’t now remember the details of which boats were involved).
There’s more than a few of these surviving from those heady days of 1897/8; one, the
‘Discovery II’ takes passengers for a guided tour of the river and its environs. Above your
head in the seating area is a lifejacket for every passenger, just in case. I suppose it’s just in
case the skipper takes off down the rapids in a fit of joie-de-vivre. Otherwise the sights
include Athabaskan villages dependent for their own survival on river fishing and making qiviut
mukluks (the warmest boots you will ever find) and carved reproduction tribal artifacts. You
have been warned.
This grand old beast used to ply the Yukon river on the run to Dawson for the Klondike goldfields,
supplying food, booze, floozies, you name it, to keep the gold diggers happy (or at least not quite
so miserable, given the dire straits most of them were in). Now run up onto the hard standing at
Whitehorse, capital of Yukon Territory and not even a half-way stage on the gruelling march to
the goldfields, the ‘Klondike’ has been a target for arsonists and vandals ever since. I'm not even
sure if she's still there (it was a good thirty years since I saw her, and I recall that I later saw a
news item that two such sternwheelers had both been destroyed by fire, but I can’t now
remember the details of which boats were involved).
There’s more than a few of these surviving from those heady days of 1897/8; one, the
‘Discovery II’ takes passengers for a guided tour of the river and its environs. Above your head in
the seating area is a lifejacket for every passenger, just in case. I suppose it’s just in case the
skipper takes off down the rapids in a fit of joie-de-vivre. Otherwise the sights include Athabaskan
villages dependent for their own survival on river fishing and making qiviut mukluks (the warmest
boots you will ever find) and carved reproduction tribal artifacts. You have been warned.

Yukon sternwheeler

mount 162b
Black & whites

A3 (c. 16"x12") print on:

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A2 (c. 23"x16") print on:
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Stern-wheeler