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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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You’ve probably seen the famous 1898
photograph of the enormous column of
gold-rush hopefuls struggling, in deep snow,
up the mountain track on the first leg of their
(mostly abortive) journey to Dawson City and
the gold fields of the Yukon. That epic struggle
to cross White Pass still exists as a trail for
those hardy enough to try it, but for the rest
of us mortals there’s now a railway line - one
of only two in Alaska - that ferries tourists
across White Pass. Crossing Dead Horse Gulch, it slugs on to Lake Bennett and other
highlights of the era towards journey's end at Whitehorse, capital of Yukon Territory in
Canada’s far northwest. This is the locomotive that used to run on the railway, though
it’s mostly used only for special occasions now, its place normally being taken by a
narrow-gauge diesel. The fare includes lunch for all at Lake Bennett and a visit to the
lakeside wooden church built by the miners - to pray for gold, no doubt. Most of them
never made it to minerhood, having spent their time, before giving up, milling around
Dawson and watching the lucky ones (literally) bathe in champagne.
For the picture, I have introduced a subtle sense of movement into the wheels as it sits
in the siding at Skagway, SE Alaska, gateway to the dream factory that was the
Klondike.
You’ve probably seen the famous 1898
photograph of the enormous column of
gold-rush hopefuls struggling, in deep
snow, up the mountain track on the first
leg of their (mostly abortive) journey to
Dawson City and the gold fields of the
Yukon. That epic struggle to cross White
Pass still exists as a trail for those hardy
enough to try it, but for the rest of us
mortals there’s now a railway line - one of
only two in Alaska - that ferries tourists
across White Pass. Crossing Dead Horse
Gulch, it slugs on to Lake Bennett and
other highlights of the era towards
journey's end at Whitehorse, capital of
Yukon Territory in Canada’s far
northwest. This is the locomotive that
used to run on the railway, though it’s
mostly used only for special occasions
now, its place normally being taken by a
narrow-gauge diesel. The fare includes
lunch for all at Lake Bennett and a visit to
the lakeside wooden church built by the
miners - to pray for gold, no doubt. Most
of them never made it to minerhood,
having spent their time, before giving up,
milling around Dawson and watching the
lucky ones (literally) bathe in
champagne.
For the picture, I have introduced a
subtle sense of movement into the wheels
as it sits in the siding at Skagway, SE
Alaska, gateway to the dream factory that
was the Klondike.
You’ve probably seen the famous 1898
photograph of the enormous column of
gold-rush hopefuls struggling, in deep snow,
up the mountain track on the first leg of their
(mostly abortive) journey to Dawson City and
the gold fields of the Yukon. That epic struggle
to cross White Pass still exists as a trail for
those hardy enough to try it, but for the rest
of us mortals there’s now a railway line - one
of only two in Alaska - that ferries tourists
across White Pass. Crossing Dead Horse Gulch, it slugs on to Lake Bennett and other
highlights of the era towards journey's end at Whitehorse, capital of Yukon Territory in
Canada’s far northwest. This is the locomotive that used to run on the railway, though
it’s mostly used only for special occasions now, its place normally being taken by a
narrow-gauge diesel. The fare includes lunch for all at Lake Bennett and a visit to the
lakeside wooden church built by the miners - to pray for gold, no doubt. Most of them
never made it to minerhood, having spent their time, before giving up, milling around
Dawson and watching the lucky ones (literally) bathe in champagne.
For the picture, I have introduced a subtle sense of movement into the wheels as it sits
in the siding at Skagway, SE Alaska, gateway to the dream factory that was the
Klondike.

White Pass/Yukon engine

You’ve probably seen the famous 1898 photograph of the enormous column of gold-rush hopefuls struggling, in deep snow, up the mountain track on the first leg of their (mostly abortive) journey to Dawson City and the gold fields of the Yukon. That epic struggle to cross White Pass still exists as a trail for those hardy enough to try it, but for the rest of us there’s now a railway line - one of only two in Alaska - that ferries tourists across White Pass and Dead Horse Gulch, to Lake Bennett and other highlights of the era towards Whitehorse, capital of Yukon Territory in Canada’s far northwest. This is the locomotive that used to run on the railway, though it’s mostly used only for special occasions now, its place normally being taken by a narrow-gauge diesel. The fare includes lunch for all at Lake Bennett and a visit to the lakeside wooden church built by the miners - to pray for gold, no doubt. Most of them never made it to minerhood, having spent their time, before giving up, milling around Dawson and watching the lucky ones (literally) bathe in champagne.
For the picture, I have introduced a subtle sense of movement into the wheels as it sits in the siding at Skagway, SE Alaska, gateway to the dream factory that was the Klondike.

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For your own fine-art print of this picture:
You’ve probably seen the famous 1898 photograph of the enormous column of gold-rush hopefuls struggling, in deep snow, up the mountain track on the first leg of their (mostly abortive) journey to Dawson City and the gold fields of the Yukon. That epic struggle to cross White Pass still exists as a trail for those hardy enough to try it, but for the rest of us mortals there’s now a railway line - one of only two in Alaska - that ferries tourists across White Pass. Crossing Dead Horse Gulch, it slugs on to Lake Bennett and other highlights of the era towards journey's end at Whitehorse, capital of Yukon Territory in Canada’s far northwest. This is the locomotive that used to run on the railway, though it’s mostly used only for special occasions now, its place normally being taken by a narrow-gauge diesel. The fare includes lunch for all at Lake Bennett and a visit to the lakeside wooden church built by the miners - to pray for gold, no doubt. Most of them never made it to minerhood, having spent their time, before giving up, milling around Dawson and watching the lucky ones (literally) bathe in champagne.
For the picture, I have introduced a subtle sense of movement into the wheels as it sits in the siding at Skagway, SE Alaska, gateway to the dream factory that was the Klondike.
The gold lining to this classic frame moulding matches the glow on the wheels

The gold lining to this classic frame moulding matches the glow on the wheels

World gallery
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence