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Prague is one of those places that have
survived and prospered despite everything
that’s been stacked against it over the
centuries, from Roman occupation to the
ravages of the Thirty Years War in the 17th
century, from being a powerhouse of the
Austro-Hungarian Empire until WW1 to
surviving Soviet hegemony for nearly half a
century after WW2. As a result the population
are politicised to a degree that is rare in the
rest of Europe, and none more so than during the days of the Prague Spring in 1968,
before the Comintern tanks rolled in to quell the anti-Russian revolution. They might as
well have used Quells.
If you like history, try Prague - there’s more of it here than almost anywhere else in
mainland Europe. It’s given us Europe’s best preserved Jewish Cemetery, Holy Roman
Emperors, writers like Kafka and heretics like Jan Hus; the spooky Castle tested the myth
of alchemy, Mozart conducted the first performance of ‘Don Giovanni’ in the Estates
Theatre (which still performs it), the Black Theatre of Prague is world famous, and the
city’s architecture is endlessly stimulating. Here is a small part of the John Lennon Wall in
the Malá Strana district, where the people can have their say, and frequently do,
although these days the messages have more to do with culture and world peace than
the politics of previous decades. I liked the play of light and shadow giving strong
diagonals over this section of wall.
Prague is one of those places that have survived and prospered despite everything that’s
been stacked against it over the centuries, from Roman occupation to the ravages of the
Thirty Years War in the 17th century, from being a powerhouse of the Austro-Hungarian
Empire until WW1 to surviving Soviet hegemony for nearly half a century after WW2. As a
result the population are politicised to a degree that is rare in the rest of Europe, and
none more so than during the days of the Prague Spring in 1968, before the Comintern
tanks rolled in to quell the anti-Russian revolution. They might as well have used Quells.
If you like history, try Prague - there’s more of it here than almost anywhere else in
mainland Europe. It’s given us Europe’s best preserved Jewish Cemetery, Holy Roman
Emperors, writers like Kafka and heretics like Jan Hus; the spooky Castle tested the myth
of alchemy, Mozart conducted the first performance of ‘Don Giovanni’ in the Estates
Theatre (which still performs it), the Black Theatre of Prague is world famous, and the
city’s architecture is endlessly stimulating. Here is a small part of the John Lennon Wall in
the Malá Strana district, where the people can have their say, and frequently do,
although these days the messages have more to do with culture and world peace than
the politics of previous decades. I liked the play of light and shadow giving strong
diagonals over this section of wall.
Prague is one of those places that have survived
and prospered despite everything that’s been
stacked against it over the centuries, from
Roman occupation to the ravages of the Thirty
Years War in the 17th century, from being a
powerhouse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire
until WW1 to surviving Soviet hegemony for
nearly half a century after WW2. As a result the
population are politicised to a degree that is
rare in the rest of Europe, and none more so
than during the days of the Prague Spring in 1968, before the Comintern tanks rolled in to
quell the anti-Russian revolution. They might as well have used Quells.
If you like history, try Prague - there’s more of it here than almost anywhere else in
mainland Europe. It’s given us Europe’s best preserved Jewish Cemetery, Holy Roman
Emperors, writers like Kafka and heretics like Jan Hus; the spooky Castle tested the myth
of alchemy, Mozart conducted the first performance of ‘Don Giovanni’ in the Estates
Theatre (which still performs it), the Black Theatre of Prague is world famous, and the
city’s architecture is endlessly stimulating. Here is a small part of the John Lennon Wall in
the Malá Strana district, where the people can have their say, and frequently do, although
these days the messages have more to do with culture and world peace than the politics of
previous decades. I liked the play of light and shadow giving strong diagonals over this
section of wall.

Lennon Wall, Prague

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For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Prague is one of those places that have survived and prospered despite everything that’s been stacked against it over the centuries, from Roman occupation to the ravages of the Thirty Years War in the 17th century, from being a powerhouse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until WW1 to surviving Soviet hegemony for nearly half a century after WW2. As a result the population are politicised to a degree that is rare in the rest of Europe, and none more so than during the days of the Prague Spring in 1968, before the Comintern tanks rolled in to quell the anti-Russian revolution. They might as well have used Quells. 
If you like history, try Prague - there’s more of it here than almost anywhere else in mainland Europe. It’s given us Europe’s best preserved Jewish Cemetery, Holy Roman Emperors, writers like Kafka and heretics like Jan Hus; the spooky Castle tested the myth of alchemy, Mozart conducted the first performance of ‘Don Giovanni’ in the Estates Theatre (which still performs it), the Black Theatre of Prague is world famous, and the city’s architecture is endlessly stimulating. Here is a small part of the John Lennon Wall in the Malá Strana district, where the people can have their say, and frequently do, although these days the messages have more to do with culture and world peace than the politics of previous decades.  I liked the play of light and shadow giving strong diagonals over this section of wall.
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