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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Suffolk has a lot of churches like this. In
medieval times, the export trade in wool to
the continent, mostly via the country's
second-largest port at the time, Dunwich, on
the Suffolk coast, made many of the
land-owning classes very rich. They often
spent their money looking after their family's
spiritual needs at the time by building parish
churches and setting up bequests for the
continual benefit of their local community or individuals. When cheaper wool from the
Americas began to flood the market, and later when cheaper cloth from the east via
European traders had a major impact on our native industry, the churches fell into
disrepair and the great wool estates collapsed.
Later still, as the industrial revolution drew workers off the land into the sweatshops and
factories of the midlands, the once-prosperous region of East Anglia, the breadbasket of
the country, struggled to survive the depopulation, and the churches suffered as well.
Coastal erosion has also played its part in the loss of many communities, most notably
that of Dunwich itself, whose church is now under the North Sea.
Suffolk has a lot of churches like this. In medieval times, the export trade in wool to the
continent, mostly via the country's second-largest port at the time, Dunwich, on the
Suffolk coast, made many of the land-owning classes very rich. They often spent their
money looking after their family's spiritual needs at the time by building parish churches
and setting up bequests for the continual benefit of their local community or individuals.
When cheaper wool from the Americas began to flood the market, and later when
cheaper cloth from the east via European traders had a major impact on our native
industry, the churches fell into disrepair and the great wool estates collapsed.
Later still, as the industrial revolution drew workers off the land into the sweatshops and
factories of the midlands, the once-prosperous region of East Anglia, the breadbasket of
the country, struggled to survive the depopulation, and the churches suffered as well.
Coastal erosion has also played its part in the loss of many communities, most notably
that of Dunwich itself, whose church is now under the North Sea.
Suffolk has a lot of churches like this. In
medieval times, the export trade in wool to
the continent, mostly via the country's
second-largest port at the time, Dunwich, on
the Suffolk coast, made many of the
land-owning classes very rich. They often
spent their money looking after their family's
spiritual needs at the time by building parish
churches and setting up bequests for the
continual benefit of their local community or individuals. When cheaper wool from the
Americas began to flood the market, and later when cheaper cloth from the east via
European traders had a major impact on our native industry, the churches fell into
disrepair and the great wool estates collapsed.
Later still, as the industrial revolution drew workers off the land into the sweatshops and
factories of the midlands, the once-prosperous region of East Anglia, the breadbasket of
the country, struggled to survive the depopulation, and the churches suffered as well.
Coastal erosion has also played its part in the loss of many communities, most notably
that of Dunwich itself, whose church is now under the North Sea.

St Andrews, Covehithe

Suffolk has a lot of churches like this. In medieval times, the export trade in wool to the continent, mostly via the country's second-largest port at the time, Dunwich, on the Suffolk coast, made many of the land-owning classes very rich. They often spent their money looking after their family's spiritual needs at the time by building parish churches and setting up bequests for the continual benefit of their local community or individuals. When cheaper wool from the Americas began to flood the market, and later when cheaper cloth from the east via European traders had a major impact on our native industry, the churches fell into disrepair and the great wool estates collapsed. 

Later still, as the industrial revolution drew workers off the land into the sweatshops and factories of the midlands, the once-prosperous region of East Anglia, the breadbasket of the country, struggled to survive the depopulation, and the churches suffered as well.  Coastal erosion has also played its part in the loss of many communities, most notably that of Dunwich itself, whose church is now under the North Sea.      
   
Float-mounted with a surrounding black 'washline' on the print and a simple black frame.

Float-mounted with a surrounding black 'washline' on the print and a simple black frame.

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