A3 (c. 16"x12") print on:

Permajet Gold Silk (£26)

Innova Soft-textured matt (£24)

A2 (c. 23"x16") print on:
Permajet Gold Silk (£40)
Innova Soft-textured matt (£36)
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framing suggestion:
See more of the Wenhaston 'Doom'  in three Sets , here
In 1892, it rained one night in Wenhaston, near Blythburgh on the Suffolk coast. The following
morning, the finest Doom ('Judgement' panel) in England was discovered on the scrapheap
outside the church, awaiting final disposal. It had been coated in whitewash 400 years earlier
and was therefore thought, when discarded, to be just a pile of rotting wood - Baltic oak,
probably. But the rain had miraculously revealed part of the Doom, and it was rescued and
conserved. Dooms were medieval church decorations, often painted by monks (though that is
not proven in this case) to instil a sense of good and evil in the not-so-faithful, and as a
reminder of the impending Judgement Day. Here, on the lower part of the Doom, which can
still be seen in Wenhaston Church, St Peter, representing the Church, considers the entry of a
bishop, a king, a cardinal and a queen to eternal life.
In 1892, it rained one night in Wenhaston, near Blythburgh on the Suffolk coast. The following
morning, the finest Doom ('Judgement' panel) in England was discovered on the scrapheap
outside the church, awaiting final disposal. It had been coated in whitewash 400 years earlier and
was therefore thought, when discarded, to be just a pile of rotting wood - Baltic oak, probably.
But the rain had miraculously revealed part of the Doom, and it was rescued and conserved.
Dooms were medieval church decorations, often painted by monks (though that is not proven in
this case) to instil a sense of good and evil in the not-so-faithful, and as a reminder of the
impending Judgement Day. Here, on the lower part of the Doom, which can still be seen in
Wenhaston Church, St Peter, representing the Church, considers the entry of a bishop, a king, a
cardinal and a queen to eternal life.

Wenhaston 'Doom' (1)

Makes a fine pair of pictures with the following image

Makes a fine pair of pictures with the following image

A3 (c. 16"x12") print on:

Permajet Gold Silk (£26)

Innova Soft-textured matt (£24)

A2 (c. 23"x16") print on:
Permajet Gold Silk (£40)
Innova Soft-textured matt (£36)