PICTURESONLINE

PICTURESONLINE

A3 (c. 16"x12") print on:

Permajet Gold Silk (£26)

Innova Soft-textured matt (£24)

A2 (c. 23"x16") print on:
Permajet Gold Silk (£40)
Innova Soft-textured matt (£36)
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract     Locomotives     Sets
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract     Locomotives     Sets
Terms & Conditions     Privacy Policy     FAQ
Print information     Contact     About     Sitemap     Links

Terms & Conditions     Privacy Policy     FAQ
Print information     Contact     About     Sitemap     Links

World
framing suggestion:
Before 'widescreen' took off as the cool format for your digital TV, everything was in the
'standard' format of 4:3, the original shape of the film gate in 35mm and 16mm film
production. All 'old' films are in 4:3, but I don't think there've been many films that have been
shot in it for at least 20 years. As a young(ish) cameraman I was delighted, to the point of
sometimes working in it for free, when Widescreen was the director's choice. I believe it
'looks' right because it more closely matches the shape of the window on the world that our
eyes see, and is consequently more comfortable as a viewing format. 4:3 survives as a
common stills format, for some reason, but most cameras now give you a choice between
the two. There are only 17 pictures on this site (10 in colour and seven in b&w) that are in
4:3 - mostly in the portrait format, which tends to disguise their 4:3-ness. The majority of
the images here are in a ratio of approximately 2:3, being a happy compromise between the
two formats. This shot is the only exception to all the usual formats, an extreme crop from a
4:3 original where there was no detail of interest in the top two thirds of the frame and which
works well as an ultra-widescreen panorama (a ratio of over 3:1).
Before 'widescreen' took off as the cool format for your digital TV, everything was in the 'standard'
format of 4:3, the original shape of the film gate in 35mm and 16mm film production. All 'old' films
are in 4:3, but I don't think there've been many films that have been shot in it for at least 20
years. As a young(ish) cameraman I was delighted, to the point of sometimes working in it for free,
when Widescreen was the director's choice. I believe it 'looks' right because it more closely
matches the shape of the window on the world that our eyes see, and is consequently more
comfortable as a viewing format. 4:3 survives as a common stills format, for some reason, but
most cameras now give you a choice between the two. There are only 17 pictures on this site (10
in colour and seven in b&w) that are in 4:3 - mostly in the portrait format, which tends to disguise
their 4:3-ness. The majority of the images here are in a ratio of approximately 2:3, being a happy
compromise between the two formats. This shot is the only exception to all the usual formats, an
extreme crop from a 4:3 original where there was no detail of interest in the top two thirds of the
frame and which works well as an ultra-widescreen panorama (a ratio of over 3:1).

Tuscan road in summer

World gallery

A3 (c. 16"x12") print on:

Permajet Gold Silk (£26)

Innova Soft-textured matt (£24)

A2 (c. 23"x16") print on:
Permajet Gold Silk (£40)
Innova Soft-textured matt (£36)