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Britain
framing suggestion:
In the 1970s I shared a flat with some mates on Kew Road, opposite the Gardens (one of
us was actually a gardener on the site at the time). It used to cost threepence, old pence
that is, to get in, about a single penny at today's rates. It cost £8 the last time I went, and
that was a few years ago, and it's still worth it. It's an odd comfort, for a botanical ignoramus
like me, to know that here is the world's foremost repository of plant species from every
conceivable location on the planet, all scientifically kept in reproducible condition for recovery in
the event of a global catastrophe. Whilst we gaily go about the destruction of the planet
itself, and its wildlife species, in the pursuit of survival or riches, we can be sure that, when
that 6-mile-wide comet hits us and the world becomes uninhabitable, all known flower, tree
and plant species are safe. Under lock and key.
Having waited long enough for this peacock to position himself in front of Kew's 'Tree of Life',
I naturally wanted him to complete the scene by dispaying his magnificent tail feathers. The
blighter refused, perhaps because there wasn't a peahen in the vicinity to display to (clearly I
wasn't adequate). I've no doubt someone will get that picture one day.
In the 1970s I shared a flat with some mates on Kew Road, opposite the Gardens (one of us was
actually a gardener on the site at the time). It used to cost threepence, old pence that is, to get
in, about a single penny at today's rates. It cost £8 the last time I went, and that was a few years
ago, and it's still worth it. It's an odd comfort, for a botanical ignoramus like me, to know that here
is the world's foremost repository of plant species from every conceivable location on the planet,
all scientifically kept in reproducible condition for recovery in the event of a global catastrophe.
Whilst we gaily go about the destruction of the planet itself, and its wildlife species, in the pursuit of
survival or riches, we can be sure that, when that 6-mile-wide comet hits us and the world
becomes uninhabitable, all known flower, tree and plant species are safe. Under lock and key.
Having waited long enough for this peacock to position himself in front of Kew's 'Tree of Life', I
naturally wanted him to complete the scene by dispaying his magnificent tail feathers. The blighter
refused, perhaps because there wasn't a peahen in the vicinity to display to (clearly I wasn't
adequate). I've no doubt someone will get that picture one day.

Tree of Life

britframes15
Britain

A3 (c. 16"x12") print on:

Permajet Gold Silk (£26)

Innova Soft-textured matt (£24)

A2 (c. 23"x16") print on:
Permajet Gold Silk (£40)
Innova Soft-textured matt (£36)