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Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract     Locomotives
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Unlike the rest of Europe, which upgraded its
railway rolling stock after WW2 - out of necessity
as much as a desire to improve the passenger
experience - Britain left it until the 1960's and
then made a right dog's dinner of a re-invented
rail system. Cue the scrapping of all our steam
locos, the loss of thousands of miles of rural track,
and the imposition upon the hapless traveller of
an inefficient diesel/electric system. If it weren't
for the steam enthusiast movement, we wouldn't
have preserved any of our old locomotives, except
perhaps for Stephenson's 'Rocket'.
And it was only when a private enterprise team
raised the money for, and eventually built, a
brand new LNER A1 Pacific (called 'Tornado') to
Arthur Peppercorn's original design - with a few
modern safety modifications - that we had an
example of this most beautiful engine to gawp at today. The entire class had been scrapped,
but now Tornado sometimes runs up the Ipswich to Cambridge line, thundering past our
house in Needham Market. This photograph (not of an A1 Pacific) was taken in the Salisbury
loco sheds in the mid-1960's, on a 5x4 Gandolfi plate camera, probably as a student exercise
in perspective control. The engine was likely, by then, to be getting up steam for its last
outing: to the scrap yard at Barry Island in South Wales.
Unlike the rest of Europe, which upgraded its railway rolling stock after WW2 - out of
necessity as much as a desire to improve the passenger experience - Britain left it until the
1960's and then made a right dog's dinner of a re-invented rail system. Cue the
scrapping of all our steam locos, the loss of thousands of miles of rural track, and the
imposition upon the hapless traveller of an inefficient diesel/electric system. If it weren't
for the steam enthusiast movement, we wouldn't have preserved any of our old
locomotives, except perhaps for Stephenson's 'Rocket'.
And it was only when a private enterprise team raised the money for, and eventually
built, a brand new LNER A1 Pacific (called 'Tornado') to Arthur Peppercorn's original
design - with a few modern safety modifications - that we had an example of this most
beautiful engine to gawp at today. The entire class had been scrapped, but now Tornado
sometimes runs up the Ipswich to Cambridge line, thundering past our house in Needham
Market. This photograph (not of an A1 Pacific) was taken in the Salisbury loco sheds in
the mid-1960's, on a 5x4 Gandolfi plate camera, probably as a student exercise in
perspective control. The engine was likely, by then, to be getting up steam for its last
outing: to the scrap yard at Barry Island in South Wales.
Unlike the rest of Europe, which upgraded its
railway rolling stock after WW2 - out of
necessity as much as a desire to improve the
passenger experience - Britain left it until the
1960's and then made a right dog's dinner of a
re-invented rail system. Cue the scrapping of all
our steam locos, the loss of thousands of miles
of rural track, and the imposition upon the
hapless traveller of an inefficient diesel/electric
system. If it weren't for the steam enthusiast
movement, we wouldn't have preserved any of
our old locomotives, except perhaps for
Stephenson's 'Rocket'.
And it was only when a private enterprise team
raised the money for, and eventually built, a
brand new LNER A1 Pacific (called 'Tornado') to
Arthur Peppercorn's original design - with a few
modern safety modifications - that we had an example of this most beautiful engine to
gawp at today. The entire class had been scrapped, but now Tornado sometimes runs up
the Ipswich to Cambridge line, thundering past our house in Needham Market. This
photograph (not of an A1 Pacific) was taken in the Salisbury loco sheds in the mid-1960's,
on a 5x4 Gandolfi plate camera, probably as a student exercise in perspective control. The
engine was likely, by then, to be getting up steam for its last outing: to the scrap yard at
Barry Island in South Wales.

Off to Barry Is.!

Looks better without being float-mounted - more direct, more dynamic.
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Locomotives