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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Assuming you can get to the upside-down
boot hanger without getting mud all over the
'nice clean floor', it's a good way to store
them since most beasties wouldn't be able to
get inside. Spiders still can, though. And it
doesn't keep photographers looking for a
quirky shot away either. I might not have sold
a copy of this print yet, but I like it, and it's a
reminder of a very pleasant weekend in
Gloucestershire with friends. Usually when
I'm away with friends I'm the source of some irritation with my tendency to lurk behind
looking for subject matter (I acquired the nickname 'Lurkio' by the same annoying habit.
But then it annoys me that everyone else rushes off without waiting...). It's true that
photography is essentially a one-man operation: without that freedom to 'lurk' a lot of
good photography just wouldn't happen. You can poke around in odd forgotten corners
to your heart's content as long as the Mrs isn't anxious to go shopping or the parking
meter's about to run out. For most of my best pictures I've lurked to one degree or
another - it's part of the job description. Henri Cartier-Bresson must have been the
consummate lurker, but never credited as such.
Assuming you can get to the upside-down
boot hanger without getting mud all over
the 'nice clean floor', it's a good way to
store them since most beasties wouldn't be
able to get inside. Spiders still can, though.
And it doesn't keep photographers looking
for a quirky shot away either. I might not
have sold a copy of this print yet, but I like
it, and it's a reminder of a very pleasant
weekend in Gloucestershire with friends.
Usually when I'm away with friends I'm the
source of some irritation with my tendency
to lurk behind looking for subject matter (I
acquired the nickname 'Lurkio' by the same
annoying habit. But then it annoys me that
everyone else rushes off without waiting...).
It's true that photography is essentially a
one-man operation: without that freedom
to 'lurk' a lot of good photography just
wouldn't happen. You can poke around in
odd forgotten corners to your heart's
content as long as the Mrs isn't anxious to
go shopping or the parking meter's about
to run out. For most of my best pictures
I've lurked to one degree or another - it's
part of the job description. Henri
Cartier-Bresson must have been the
consummate lurker, but never credited as
such.
Assuming you can get to the upside-down
boot hanger without getting mud all over the
'nice clean floor', it's a good way to store
them since most beasties wouldn't be able to
get inside. Spiders still can, though. And it
doesn't keep photographers looking for a
quirky shot away either. I might not have
sold a copy of this print yet, but I like it, and
it's a reminder of a very pleasant weekend in
Gloucestershire with friends. Usually when
I'm away with friends I'm the source of some irritation with my tendency to lurk behind
looking for subject matter (I acquired the nickname 'Lurkio' by the same annoying habit.
But then it annoys me that everyone else rushes off without waiting...). It's true that
photography is essentially a one-man operation: without that freedom to 'lurk' a lot of
good photography just wouldn't happen. You can poke around in odd forgotten corners
to your heart's content as long as the Mrs isn't anxious to go shopping or the parking
meter's about to run out. For most of my best pictures I've lurked to one degree or
another - it's part of the job description. Henri Cartier-Bresson must have been the
consummate lurker, but never credited as such.
Assuming you can get to the upside-down boot hanger without getting mud all over the 'nice clean floor', it's a good way to store them since most beasties wouldn't be able to get inside. Spiders still can, though. And it doesn't keep photographers looking for a quirky shot away either. I might not have sold a copy of this print yet, but I like it, and it's a reminder of a very pleasant weekend in Gloucestershire with friends. Usually when I'm away with friends I'm the source of some irritation with my tendency to lurk behind looking for subject matter (I acquired the nickname 'Lurkio' by the same annoying habit. But then it annoys me that everyone else rushes off without waiting...).  It's true that photography is essentially a one-man operation: without that freedom to 'lurk' a lot of good photography just wouldn't happen. You can poke around in odd forgotten corners to your heart's content as long as the Mrs isn't anxious to go shopping or the parking meter's about to run out. For most of my best pictures I've lurked to one degree or another - it's part of the job description. Henri Cartier-Bresson must have been the consummate lurker, but never credited as such.
For your own fine-art print of this picture:
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Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract     Locomotives
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract     Locomotives

"Get your filthy boots off my nice clean floor..."

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Simple black wood frame, or perhaps a black box frame would look good here.

Simple black wood frame, or perhaps a black box frame would look good here.