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Snape Maltings bench

At a basic level, there are certain elements that in
combination make a typical 'good' photograph:
subject matter nowithstanding, you need the
correct exposure, the 'right' degree of contrast,
optical definition, a feeling for composition and a
certain one-ness with the subject. And, most
importantly - and I've only come lately to realise
this - a total disregard for whether anyone else
likes the picture or not. Ask ten people to chose
their favourites among your pictures and you'll get ten different answers. Display your work
on a market stall and often the most unlikely will sell. It takes all sorts, but the best critic of
your work is you, and it's your choices that count. The camera itself is almost irrelevant - it's
simply a means of achieving the desired technical elements, and in the right hands a lens-less
pinhole camera will be as good as a NASA Hasselblad with space-age optics. Detail is
normally an essential aspect of a good photograph too: but if you were inside an old
locomotive shed, for instance, you’d have intense rays of sunshine pouring through holes in
the roof and deep blacks in the surrounding gloom, yet nobody (except perhaps the Royal
Photographic Society) will be expecting to see detail in a photograph of those impossible
areas. But here's a favourite picture that breaks a few of those rules. Like the loco shed, the
contrasts here (after post-production) are extreme, where shadow detail under the bench
has been sacrificed in favour of highlight detail in the reeds, the composition is eccentric with
the subject being too central, and the texture overlay probably not to everyone's liking.
At a basic level, there are certain elements that
in combination make a typical 'good'
photograph: subject matter nowithstanding, you
need the correct exposure, the 'right' degree of
contrast, optical definition, a feeling for
composition and a certain one-ness with the
subject. And, most importantly - and I've only
come lately to realise this - a total disregard for
whether anyone else likes the picture or not. Ask ten people to chose their favourites among
your pictures and you'll get ten different answers. Display your work on a market stall and
often the most unlikely will sell. It takes all sorts, but the best critic of your work is you, and
it's your choices that count. The camera itself is almost irrelevant - it's simply a means of
achieving the desired technical elements, and in the right hands a lens-less pinhole camera
will be as good as a NASA Hasselblad with space-age optics. Detail is normally an essential
aspect of a good photograph too: but if you were inside an old locomotive shed, for instance,
you’d have intense rays of sunshine pouring through holes in the roof and deep blacks in the
surrounding gloom, yet nobody (except perhaps the Royal Photographic Society) will be
expecting to see detail in a photograph of those impossible areas. But here's a favourite
picture that breaks a few of those rules. Like the loco shed, the contrasts here (after
post-production) are extreme, where shadow detail under the bench has been sacrificed in
favour of highlight detail in the reeds, the composition is eccentric with the subject being too
central, and the texture overlay probably not to everyone's liking.
At a basic level, there are certain elements that in combination make a typical 'good' photograph: subject matter nowithstanding, you need the correct exposure, the 'right' degree of contrast, optical definition, a feeling for composition and a certain one-ness with the subject. And, most importantly - and I've only come lately to realise this - a total disregard for whether anyone else likes the picture or not. Ask ten people to chose their favourites among your pictures and you'll get ten different answers. Display your work on a market stall and often the most unlikely will sell. It takes all sorts, but the best critic of your work is you, and it's your choices that count. The camera itself is almost irrelevant - it's simply a means of achieving the desired technical elements, and in the right hands a lens-less pinhole camera will be as good as a NASA Hasselblad with space-age optics.   Detail is normally an essential aspect of a good photograph too: but if you were inside an old locomotive shed, for instance, you’d have intense rays of sunshine pouring through holes in the roof and deep blacks in the surrounding gloom, yet nobody (except perhaps the Royal Photographic Society) will be expecting to see detail in a photograph of those impossible areas.   But here's a favourite picture that breaks a few of those rules. Like the loco shed, the contrasts here (after post-production) are extreme, where shadow detail under the bench has been sacrificed in favour of highlight detail in the reeds, the composition is eccentric with the subject being too central, and the texture overlay probably not to everyone's liking.


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At a basic level, there are certain elements that in combination make a typical 'good' photograph: subject matter nowithstanding, you need the correct exposure, the 'right' degree of contrast, optical definition, a feeling for composition and a certain one-ness with the subject. And, most importantly - and I've only come lately to realise this - a total disregard for whether anyone else likes the picture or not. Ask ten people to chose their favourites among your pictures and you'll get ten different answers. Display your work on a market stall and often the most unlikely will sell. It takes all sorts, but the best critic of your work is you, and it's your choices that count. The camera itself is almost irrelevant - it's simply a means of achieving the desired technical elements, and in the right hands a lens-less pinhole camera will be as good as a NASA Hasselblad with space-age optics.   Detail is normally an essential aspect of a good photograph too: but if you were inside an old locomotive shed, for instance, you’d have intense rays of sunshine pouring through holes in the roof and deep blacks in the surrounding gloom, yet nobody (except perhaps the Royal Photographic Society) will be expecting to see detail in a photograph of those impossible areas.   But here's a favourite picture that breaks a few of those rules. Like the loco shed, the contrasts here (after post-production) are extreme, where shadow detail under the bench has been sacrificed in favour of highlight detail in the reeds, the composition is eccentric with the subject being too central, and the texture overlay probably not to everyone's liking.  
Framing suggestion

Framing suggestion

Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Locomotives
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Locomotives