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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Darkening gloom over the beach at
Walberswick, on Suffolk's North Sea coast.
Apart from the village, set well back from the
sea, there's little here on the beach except the
pub, a few cottages and some fishermen's
sheds, which is why the spot is such a
year-round favourite. However, on this
freezing day in February, everyone - apart
from your heroic photographer, that is - was
sensibly in the pub tucking into steak and ale
pie and some of East Anglia's best ale without steak pie around it. By the time we got to
the Bell Inn, under the darkest bit of the cloud you can see here, it was, of course, raining
as well, so we had no choice but to stay for lunch.
This is an infra-red photograph, taken using an IR72 filter which only passes wavelengths
of 72nm or more: ie. beyond the reach of the human eye. Most digital cameras will take
an infra-red picture, but you'll need an IR filter to cut out the 'normal' electromagnetic
spectrum - the bit we can see. The best way to tell if your camera can shoot infra-red is
to point a TV remote at it and see if you can see a feint glow in the viewfinder or on the
screen when a button on the remote is pushed. If you do, then your camera can shoot
infra-red. Refer to internet advice* on how to shoot IR and convert your picture to a
usable black and white image.
Darkening gloom over the beach at Walberswick, on Suffolk's North Sea coast. Apart
from the village, set well back from the sea, there's little here on the beach except the
pub, a few cottages and some fishermen's sheds, which is why the spot is such a
year-round favourite. However, on this freezing day in February, everyone - apart from
your heroic photographer, that is - was sensibly in the pub tucking into steak and ale pie
and some of East Anglia's best ale without steak pie around it. By the time we got to the
Bell Inn, under the darkest bit of the cloud you can see here, it was, of course, raining as
well, so we had no choice but to stay for lunch.
This is an infra-red photograph, taken using an IR72 filter which only passes wavelengths
of 72nm or more: ie. beyond the reach of the human eye. Most digital cameras will take
an infra-red picture, but you'll need an IR filter to cut out the 'normal' electromagnetic
spectrum - the bit we can see. The best way to tell if your camera can shoot infra-red is
to point a TV remote at it and see if you can see a feint glow in the viewfinder or on the
screen when a button on the remote is pushed. If you do, then your camera can shoot
infra-red. Refer to internet advice* on how to shoot IR and convert your picture to a
usable black and white image.
Darkening gloom over the beach at
Walberswick, on Suffolk's North Sea coast.
Apart from the village, set well back from the
sea, there's little here on the beach except the
pub, a few cottages and some fishermen's
sheds, which is why the spot is such a
year-round favourite. However, on this
freezing day in February, everyone - apart from
your heroic photographer, that is - was
sensibly in the pub tucking into steak and ale
pie and some of East Anglia's best ale without steak pie around it. By the time we got to
the Bell Inn, under the darkest bit of the cloud you can see here, it was, of course, raining
as well, so we had no choice but to stay for lunch.
This is an infra-red photograph, taken using an IR72 filter which only passes wavelengths
of 72nm or more: ie. beyond the reach of the human eye. Most digital cameras will take
an infra-red picture, but you'll need an IR filter to cut out the 'normal' electromagnetic
spectrum - the bit we can see. The best way to tell if your camera can shoot infra-red is to
point a TV remote at it and see if you can see a feint glow in the viewfinder or on the
screen when a button on the remote is pushed. If you do, then your camera can shoot
infra-red. Refer to internet advice* on how to shoot IR and convert your picture to a
usable black and white image.

Black day, white beach

Darkening gloom over the beach at Walberswick, on Suffolk's North Sea coast.  Apart from the village, set well back from the sea, there's little here on the beach except the pub, a few cottages and some fishermen's sheds, which is why the spot is such a year-round favourite.  However, on this freezing day in February, everyone - apart from your heroic photographer, that is - was sensibly in the pub tucking into steak and ale pie and some of East Anglia's best ale without steak pie around it.  By the time we got to the Bell Inn, under the darkest bit of the cloud you can see here, it was, of course, raining as well, so we had no choice but to stay for lunch.

This is an infra-red photograph, taken using an IR72 filter which only passes wavelengths of 72nm or more: ie. beyond the reach of the human eye. Most digital cameras will take an infra-red picture, but you'll need an IR filter to cut out the 'normal' electromagnetic spectrum - the bit we can see.  The best way to tell if your camera can shoot infra-red is to point a TV remote at it and see if you can see a feint glow in the viewfinder or on the screen when a button on the remote is pushed. If you do, then your camera can shoot infra-red. Refer to internet advice* on how to shoot IR and convert your picture to a usable black and white image. 
This picture benefits from a wide mount and a narrow, plain, black frame

This picture benefits from a wide mount and a narrow, plain, black frame

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Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence