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Wachusett Inlet, to give it the local Tlingit
Indian name, is a branch of Glacier Bay in SE
Alaska which is now designated as, and
therefore has the protected status of, a
National Park. In 1977, a colleague and I
joined a London University team (who were
studying the hydrobiology of glacial
melt-water streams) to make our second film,
which ended up on television as a half-hour
documentary on the retreat of the tide-water
glaciers and the transition from total glaciation to mature forest. All stages of this
process could be seen in Glacier Bay at the time. Our film was shot on a clockwork Bolex
with one 400ft mag, a wooden tripod and a few borrowed lenses. With only about
5000ft of colour neg stock, we managed to stretch our previous (Naples) film's desperate
shooting ratio of 2:1 to about 5:1 - quite an achievement given that most of it was on
the wildlife here.
The U-shaped valleys that you can see in this picture will be forested by now with Sitka
spruce and other firs of the boreal forest belt, with a thick carpet of mosses and lichens
underfoot. Streams that hadn't existed for 10,000 years are now home to migrating
salmon, and bears, wolves, moose and bald eagles are now in possession of land that
was under 200ft of ice when Capt. James Cook passed this way in 1778, 200 years ahead
of us.
Wachusett Inlet, to give it the local Tlingit Indian name, is a branch of Glacier Bay in SE
Alaska which is now designated as, and therefore has the protected status of, a National
Park. In 1977, a colleague and I joined a London University team (who were studying the
hydrobiology of glacial melt-water streams) to make our second film, which ended up on
television as a half-hour documentary on the retreat of the tide-water glaciers and the
transition from total glaciation to mature forest. All stages of this process could be seen
in Glacier Bay at the time. Our film was shot on a clockwork Bolex with one 400ft mag, a
wooden tripod and a few borrowed lenses. With only about 5000ft of colour neg stock,
we managed to stretch our previous (Naples) film's desperate shooting ratio of 2:1 to
about 5:1 - quite an achievement given that most of it was on the wildlife here.
The U-shaped valleys that you can see in this picture will be forested by now with Sitka
spruce and other firs of the boreal forest belt, with a thick carpet of mosses and lichens
underfoot. Streams that hadn't existed for 10,000 years are now home to migrating
salmon, and bears, wolves, moose and bald eagles are now in possession of land that
was under 200ft of ice when Capt. James Cook passed this way in 1778, 200 years ahead
of us.
Wachusett Inlet, to give it the local Tlingit
Indian name, is a branch of Glacier Bay in SE
Alaska which is now designated as, and
therefore has the protected status of, a
National Park. In 1977, a colleague and I
joined a London University team (who were
studying the hydrobiology of glacial
melt-water streams) to make our second film,
which ended up on television as a half-hour
documentary on the retreat of the tide-water
glaciers and the transition from total glaciation to mature forest. All stages of this
process could be seen in Glacier Bay at the time. Our film was shot on a clockwork Bolex
with one 400ft mag, a wooden tripod and a few borrowed lenses. With only about
5000ft of colour neg stock, we managed to stretch our previous (Naples) film's desperate
shooting ratio of 2:1 to about 5:1 - quite an achievement given that most of it was on
the wildlife here.
The U-shaped valleys that you can see in this picture will be forested by now with Sitka
spruce and other firs of the boreal forest belt, with a thick carpet of mosses and lichens
underfoot. Streams that hadn't existed for 10,000 years are now home to migrating
salmon, and bears, wolves, moose and bald eagles are now in possession of land that
was under 200ft of ice when Capt. James Cook passed this way in 1778, 200 years ahead
of us.

Glacial Bay

Wachusett Inlet, to give it the local Tlingit Indian name, is a branch of Glacier Bay in SE Alaska which is now designated as, and therefore has the protected status of, a National Park.  In 1977, a colleague and I joined a London University team (who were studying the hydrobiology of glacial melt-water streams) to make our second film, which ended up on television as a half-hour documentary on the retreat of the tide-water glaciers and the transition from total glaciation to mature forest.  All stages of this process could be seen in Glacier Bay at the time.  Our film was shot on a clockwork Bolex with one 400ft mag, a wooden tripod and a few borrowed lenses. With only about 5000ft of colour neg stock, we managed to stretch our previous (Naples) film's desperate shooting ratio of 2:1 to about 5:1 - quite an achievement given that most of it was on the wildlife here.  

The U-shaped valleys that you can see in this picture will be forested by now with Sitka spruce and other firs of the boreal forest belt, with a thick carpet of mosses and lichens underfoot.  Streams that hadn't existed for 10,000 years are now home to migrating salmon, and bears, wolves, moose and bald eagles are now in possession of land that was under 200ft of ice when Capt. James Cook passed this way in 1778, 200 years ahead of us. 


 
A wide mount is suitable for a 'big field' landscape, as is a plain black frame

A wide mount is suitable for a 'big field' landscape, as is a plain black frame

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