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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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What can you say about a streetlight, except
that they are the most awkward things to
photograph when they're lampposts. Up on a
wall they're fine, but I once had to film a
cramped exhibition of antique Italian
lampposts in a house in Kensington for some
news report or other, with just a camera and
a tripod. No crane, which would have made it
pictorially interesting, no track for moving
shots, no lights - pardon the pun - and no idea
what the script was going to be about either.
Not my favourite job.
This lamp is in Volterra, on the outside wall of
the excellent Etruscan Museum. I've treated it
in digital post-production as an old Victorian
'Calotype', which William Henry Fox-Talbot
invented in the early 1840's. Incidentally I was
taught 'art' (not very well, I might add) at
Salisbury during my first year of applied photography by one Major Fox-Talbot, the old
boy's great-great-(great?) grandson who was himself about 90 at the time. I don't know
what he would've made of my skills as a photographic 'artist', but we probably would've
argued over what constituted 'art' in a technical - ie.photographic' - sense. I still do.
What can you say about a streetlight, except that they are the most awkward things to
photograph when they're lampposts. Up on a wall they're fine, but I once had to film a
cramped exhibition of antique Italian lampposts in a house in Kensington for some news
report or other, with just a camera and a tripod. No crane, which would have made it
pictorially interesting, no track for moving shots, no lights - pardon the pun - and no idea
what the script was going to be about either. Not my favourite job.
This lamp is in Volterra, on the outside wall of the excellent Etruscan Museum. I've
treated it in digital post-production as an old Victorian 'Calotype', which William Henry
Fox-Talbot invented in the early 1840's. Incidentally I was taught 'art' (not very well, I
might add) at Salisbury during my first year of applied photography by one Major
Fox-Talbot, the old boy's great-great-(great?) grandson who was himself about 90 at the
time. I don't know what he would've made of my skills as a photographic 'artist', but we
probably would've argued over what constituted 'art' in a technical - ie.photographic' -
sense. I still do.
What can you say about a streetlight, except
that they are the most awkward things to
photograph when they're lampposts. Up on a
wall they're fine, but I once had to film a
cramped exhibition of antique Italian
lampposts in a house in Kensington for some
news report or other, with just a camera and
a tripod. No crane, which would have made it
pictorially interesting, no track for moving
shots, no lights - pardon the pun - and no idea
what the script was going to be about either.
Not my favourite job.
This lamp is in Volterra, on the outside wall of
the excellent Etruscan Museum. I've treated it
in digital post-production as an old Victorian
'Calotype', which William Henry Fox-Talbot
invented in the early 1840's. Incidentally I was
taught 'art' (not very well, I might add) at
Salisbury during my first year of applied photography by one Major Fox-Talbot, the old
boy's great-great-(great?) grandson who was himself about 90 at the time. I don't know
what he would've made of my skills as a photographic 'artist', but we probably would've
argued over what constituted 'art' in a technical - ie.photographic' - sense. I still do.

Street light, Volterra

See the 'Before and After' images
What can you say about a streetlight, except that they are the most awkward things to photograph when they're lampposts.  Up on a wall they're fine, but I once had to film a cramped exhibition of antique Italian lampposts in a house in Kensington for some news report or other, with just a camera and a tripod. No crane, which would have made it pictorially interesting, no track for moving shots, no lights - pardon the pun - and no idea what the script was going to be about either.  Not my favourite job. 

This lamp is in Volterra, on the outside wall of the excellent Etruscan Museum.  I've treated it in digital post-production as an old Victorian 'Calotype', which William Henry Fox-Talbot invented in the early 1840's. Incidentally I was taught 'art' (not very well, I might add) at Salisbury during my first year of applied photography by one Major Fox-Talbot, the old boy's great-great-(great?) grandson who was himself about 90 at the time. I don't know what he would've made of my skills as a photographic 'artist', but we probably would've argued over what constituted 'art' in a technical - ie.photographic' - sense. I still do.
  
An 'old-fashioned' picture with a modern twist in a polished hardwood frame

An 'old-fashioned' picture with a modern twist in a polished hardwood frame

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