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This is a detail of what I took to be a trench
mortar at the WW1 museum site called
'Sanctuary Wood', a fascinating if rather badly
curated (no labels, no information) collection of
WW1 artifacts gathered over the years from its
location just a few miles from Ypres in Belgium.
The site contains one of the few extant
examples of actual trenches - complete with
dugouts and tunnels - although the parapets
have been worn down and away over the years.
It was heartening to see coachloads of kids,
with their teachers, coming to be given lectures
at the site; it seemed to suggest that, contrary
to popular belief, this terrible slice of history is
still being taught, even in situ. These groups
would then go on to important sites like Tyne
Cot and other meticulously tended cemeteries,
and the actual sites of brutal warfare like the
Messines Ridge, the Somme and Ancre Rivers
and Passchendaele. In the meantime, Sanctuary Wood contains photographs of the sort
of damage that trench mortars like this did to human beings...
This is a detail of what I took to be a trench mortar at the WW1 museum site called
'Sanctuary Wood', a fascinating if rather badly curated (no labels, no information)
collection of WW1 artifacts gathered over the years from its location just a few miles from
Ypres in Belgium. The site contains one of the few extant examples of actual trenches -
complete with dugouts and tunnels - although the parapets have been worn down and
away over the years. It was heartening to see coachloads of kids, with their teachers,
coming to be given lectures at the site; it seemed to suggest that, contrary to popular
belief, this terrible slice of history is still being taught, even in situ. These groups would then
go on to important sites like Tyne Cot and other meticulously tended cemeteries, and the
actual sites of brutal warfare like the Messines Ridge, the Somme and Ancre Rivers and
Passchendaele. In the meantime, Sanctuary Wood contains photographs of the sort of
damage that trench mortars like this did to human beings...
This is a detail of what I took to be a trench
mortar at the WW1 museum site called
'Sanctuary Wood', a fascinating if rather badly
curated (no labels, no information) collection of
WW1 artifacts gathered over the years from its
location just a few miles from Ypres in Belgium.
The site contains one of the few extant examples
of actual trenches - complete with dugouts and
tunnels - although the parapets have been worn
down and away over the years. It was
heartening to see coachloads of kids, with their
teachers, coming to be given lectures at the site;
it seemed to suggest that, contrary to popular
belief, this terrible slice of history is still being
taught, even in situ. These groups would then go
on to important sites like Tyne Cot and other
meticulously tended cemeteries, and the actual
sites of brutal warfare like the Messines Ridge,
the Somme and Ancre Rivers and Passchendaele.
In the meantime, Sanctuary Wood contains photographs of the sort of damage that
trench mortars like this did to human beings...

Trench mortar, WW1

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This is a detail of what I took to be a trench mortar at the WW1 museum site called 'Sanctuary Wood', a fascinating if rather badly curated (no labels, no information) collection of WW1 artifacts gathered over the years from its location just a few miles from Ypres in Belgium. The site contains one of the few extant examples of actual trenches - complete with dugouts and tunnels - although the parapets have been worn down and away over the years.  It was heartening to see coachloads of kids, with their teachers, coming to be given lectures at the site; it seemed to suggest that, contrary to popular belief, this terrible slice of history is still being taught, even in situ. These groups would then go on to important sites like Tyne Cot and other meticulously tended cemeteries, and the actual sites of brutal warfare like the Messines Ridge, the Somme and Ancre Rivers and Passchendaele. In the meantime, Sanctuary Wood contains photographs of the sort of damage that trench mortars like this did to human beings...
mortar
World gallery
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