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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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In the background to this shot, Britain's
largest deep-water container port,
Felixstowe Docks, at the confluence of the
Stour and the Deben estuaries, carries
something like 40% of Britain's
import/export traffic. But that's really
boring - check out the foreground! This is
apparently an E-boat, the sort of German
high-speed motor-torpedo boat that in
WW2 harried our shipping and lunches,
although this one has been converted for private use and doesn't often torpedo shipping
any more. Riding the tide between Harwich, Felixstowe and Shotley Point, its three
masts are a nice counterpoint to the new cranes in the Docks.
In the early decades of flight, Felixstowe was the location of the RAF's testing
establishment for all new types, including RJ Mitchell's Supermarine float planes that
won the Schneider Trophy for Britain in 1931 and which led directly to the Spitfire, that
most iconic of all fighter aircraft.
In the background to this shot, Britain's largest deep-water container port, Felixstowe
Docks, at the confluence of the Stour and the Deben estuaries, carries something like
40% of Britain's import/export traffic. But that's really boring - check out the
foreground! This is apparently an E-boat, the sort of German high-speed motor-torpedo
boat that in WW2 harried our shipping and lunches, although this one has been
converted for private use and doesn't often torpedo shipping any more. Riding the tide
between Harwich, Felixstowe and Shotley Point, its three masts are a nice counterpoint
to the new cranes in the Docks.
In the early decades of flight, Felixstowe was the location of the RAF's testing
establishment for all new types, including RJ Mitchell's Supermarine float planes that
won the Schneider Trophy for Britain in 1931 and which led directly to the Spitfire, that
most iconic of all fighter aircraft.
In the background to this shot, Britain's
largest deep-water container port,
Felixstowe Docks, at the confluence of the
Stour and the Deben estuaries, carries
something like 40% of Britain's
import/export traffic. But that's really
boring - check out the foreground! This is
apparently an E-boat, the sort of German
high-speed motor-torpedo boat that in
WW2 harried our shipping and lunches,
although this one has been converted for private use and doesn't often torpedo shipping
any more. Riding the tide between Harwich, Felixstowe and Shotley Point, its three
masts are a nice counterpoint to the new cranes in the Docks.
In the early decades of flight, Felixstowe was the location of the RAF's testing
establishment for all new types, including RJ Mitchell's Supermarine float planes that
won the Schneider Trophy for Britain in 1931 and which led directly to the Spitfire, that
most iconic of all fighter aircraft.

Three-masted E-boat


For your own fine-art print of this picture:
In the background to this shot, Britain's largest deep-water container port, Felixstowe Docks, at the confluence of the Stour and the Deben estuaries, carries something like 40% of Britain's import/export traffic.  But that's really boring - check out the foreground!  This is apparently an E-boat, the sort of German high-speed motor-torpedo boat that in WW2 harried our shipping and lunches, although this one has been converted for private use and doesn't often torpedo shipping any more.  Riding the tide between Harwich, Felixstowe and Shotley Point, its three masts are a nice counterpoint to the new cranes in the Docks.

In the early decades of flight, Felixstowe was the location of the RAF's testing establishment for all new types, including RJ Mitchell's Supermarine float planes that won the Schneider Trophy for Britain in 1931 and which led directly to the Spitfire, that most iconic of all fighter aircraft.
 
Classic black frame with floated mount and black line around image

Classic black frame with floated mount and black line around image

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