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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and built in the
late 1920's as a memorial to over 72,000
British, Commonwealth and French war dead
whose bodies were never found after the
Somme disaster, the Thiepval Memorial
stands in the grounds of the former Thiepval
Chateau, an early victim of the local offensive.
Its massive size makes it difficult to
photograph, which is why I tried to disguise
the converging verticals by shooting from
amongst the trees. You can get a sense of its scale from the doorways visible in the front
face here. The Memorial, with its additional cemetery beyond, is as heart breaking as all
the other WW1 cemeteries - hundreds of them all over Picardy and Flanders, all
exquisitely tended by locals and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. And as
the Portland stone panels that carry the names of the lost weather and become
unreadable, so they are beautifully re-carved and replaced.
For me, this was always going to be a black and white winter image. Colour - bright blue
sky, trees in leaf and a sunlit glare off the stone - would seem wrong somehow, as if a
frivolous response to the colossal sacrifice commemorated here.
Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and built in the late 1920's as a memorial to over 72,000
British, Commonwealth and French war dead whose bodies were never found after the
Somme disaster, the Thiepval Memorial stands in the grounds of the former Thiepval
Chateau, an early victim of the local offensive. Its massive size makes it difficult to
photograph, which is why I tried to disguise the converging verticals by shooting from
amongst the trees. You can get a sense of its scale from the doorways visible in the front
face here. The Memorial, with its additional cemetery beyond, is as heart breaking as all
the other WW1 cemeteries - hundreds of them all over Picardy and Flanders, all
exquisitely tended by locals and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. And as
the Portland stone panels that carry the names of the lost weather and become
unreadable, so they are beautifully re-carved and replaced.
For me, this was always going to be a black and white winter image. Colour - bright blue
sky, trees in leaf and a sunlit glare off the stone - would seem wrong somehow, as if a
frivolous response to the colossal sacrifice commemorated here.
Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and built in the
late 1920's as a memorial to over 72,000
British, Commonwealth and French war dead
whose bodies were never found after the
Somme disaster, the Thiepval Memorial
stands in the grounds of the former Thiepval
Chateau, an early victim of the local offensive.
Its massive size makes it difficult to
photograph, which is why I tried to disguise
the converging verticals by shooting from
amongst the trees. You can get a sense of its scale from the doorways visible in the front
face here. The Memorial, with its additional cemetery beyond, is as heart breaking as all
the other WW1 cemeteries - hundreds of them all over Picardy and Flanders, all
exquisitely tended by locals and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. And as
the Portland stone panels that carry the names of the lost weather and become
unreadable, so they are beautifully re-carved and replaced.
For me, this was always going to be a black and white winter image. Colour - bright blue
sky, trees in leaf and a sunlit glare off the stone - would seem wrong somehow, as if a
frivolous response to the colossal sacrifice commemorated here.

Thiepval Memorial

Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and built in the late 1920's as a memorial to over 72,000 British, Commonwealth and French war dead whose bodies were never found after the Somme disaster, the Thiepval Memorial stands in the grounds of the former Thiepval Chateau, an early victim of the local offensive.  Its massive size makes it difficult to photograph, which is why I tried to disguise the converging verticals by shooting from amongst the trees.  You can get a sense of its scale from the doorways visible in the front face here.  The Memorial, with its additional cemetery beyond, is as heart breaking as all the other WW1 cemeteries - hundreds of them all over Picardy and Flanders, all exquisitely tended by locals and the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.  And as the Portland stone panels that carry the names of the lost weather and become unreadable, so they are beautifully re-carved and replaced. 

For me, this was always going to be a black and white winter image. Colour - bright blue sky, trees in leaf and a sunlit glare off the stone - would seem wrong somehow, as if a frivolous response to the colossal sacrifice commemorated here. 

The thin black line around the image is reminiscent of a watercolour's wash line.

The thin black line around the image is reminiscent of a watercolour's wash line.

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