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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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I don't know how wide-spread the term
'termination dust' is, but I first heard it as
a description for a light dusting of snow
over the Chugach Hills in SE Alaska,
meaning, presumably, that it signalled the
end of decent weather and the start of
another long, hard winter. Unlike Alaska,
winter here doesn't usually arrive with a
bang and six-foot snow drifts, so I find this
expression a nice way to softly ease into
this last season of the year. Alaskans seem
to be masochistically attached to their
brutal five or seven-month shut-down, but
we softies don't usually have such hard
winters, and those that we do have, like
1962-3, we remember for generations (apparently I was born in the middle of one,
1947). So in southern Britain, we tend to look forward to our 'termination dust', knowing
that it's possibly all we'll get.
I don't know how wide-spread the term 'termination dust' is, but I first heard it as a
description for a light dusting of snow over the Chugach Hills in SE Alaska, meaning,
presumably, that it signalled the end of decent weather and the start of another long,
hard winter. Unlike Alaska, winter here doesn't usually arrive with a bang and six-foot
snow drifts, so I find this expression a nice way to softly ease into this last season of the
year. Alaskans seem to be masochistically attached to their brutal five or seven-month
shut-down, but we softies don't usually have such hard winters, and those that we do
have, like 1962-3, we remember for generations (apparently I was born in the middle of
one, 1947). So in southern Britain, we tend to look forward to our 'termination dust',
knowing that it's possibly all we'll get.
I don't know how wide-spread the term
'termination dust' is, but I first heard it as
a description for a light dusting of snow
over the Chugach Hills in SE Alaska,
meaning, presumably, that it signalled the
end of decent weather and the start of
another long, hard winter. Unlike Alaska,
winter here doesn't usually arrive with a
bang and six-foot snow drifts, so I find this
expression a nice way to softly ease into
this last season of the year. Alaskans seem
to be masochistically attached to their
brutal five or seven-month shut-down, but
we softies don't usually have such hard
winters, and those that we do have, like
1962-3, we remember for generations (apparently I was born in the middle of one,
1947). So in southern Britain, we tend to look forward to our 'termination dust', knowing
that it's possibly all we'll get.

Termination dust


For your own fine-art print of this picture:
I don't know how wide-spread the term 'termination dust' is, but I first heard it as a description for a light dusting of snow over the Chugach Hills in SE Alaska, meaning, presumably, that it signalled the end of decent weather and the start of another long, hard winter.  Unlike Alaska, winter here doesn't usually arrive with a bang and six-foot snow drifts, so I find this expression a nice way to softly ease into this last season of the year. Alaskans seem to be masochistically attached to their brutal five or seven-month shut-down, but we softies don't usually have such hard winters, and those that we do have, like 1962-3, we remember for generations (apparently I was born in the middle of one, 1947). So in southern Britain, we tend to look forward to our 'termination dust', knowing that it's possibly all we'll get.
The 'snowy' look of a white frame, plus a double-mount

The 'snowy' look of a white frame, plus a double-mount

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Suffolk
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence