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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
See the 'Before and After' images
  Five available on discount page (No.s 419-423)

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Sometimes us photographers just get lucky.
The vast majority of professional
photographers, of course, are dedicated to a
job they love, and will wait hours, primed like
a hair trigger, for the perfect shot. While the
papparazzi rely on luck as well as skill for
their dinner, the wildlife photographer has
subsumed his whole being to the pursuit of
better pictures of that kingfisher, that mating
earthworm, or the lion in for the kill. But us
lesser mortals can also get a buzz when an
off-the-cuff picture comes out well. On leaving
the venue for the Sheepdog Trials there was a
gap in the crowd wandering over Haughley
Park just as I passed a beautiful row of silver birches. I thought I saw a picture there, of
the tall trees and their shadows making the sort of natural pattern I particularly like.
But in the edit suite later, the picture just wouldn’t resolve into a good composition.
Either I should have got closer and made more of the verticals, or further back for a long
shot, but the exiting crowds would’ve made that difficult. I was rescued by a crop that
eliminated the birches completely in favour of a lone tree off to the right. The subsequent
loss of resolution was disguised by a little diffusion and by introducing some creative
elements that heightened the sense of ‘summer’. The picture happily split itself into the
legendary ‘thirds’ horizontally with the tree-trunk dead centre vertically.
Sometimes us photographers just get lucky. The vast majority of professional photographers, of course, are dedicated to a job they love, and will wait hours, primed like a hair trigger, for the perfect shot.
While the papparazzi rely on luck as well as skill for their dinner, the wildlife photographer has subsumed his whole being to the pursuit of better pictures of that kingfisher, that mating earthworm, or the
lion in for the kill. But us lesser mortals can also get a buzz when an off-the-cuff picture comes out well. On leaving the venue for the Sheepdog Trials there was a gap in the crowd wandering over Haughley
Park just as I passed a beautiful row of silver birches. I thought I saw a picture there, of the tall trees and their shadows making the sort of natural pattern I particularly like. But in the edit suite later, the
picture just wouldn’t resolve into a good composition. Either I should have got closer and made more of the verticals, or further back for a long shot, but the exiting crowds would’ve made that difficult. I
was rescued by a crop that eliminated the birches completely in favour of a lone tree off to the right. The subsequent loss of resolution was disguised by a little diffusion and by introducing some creative
elements that heightened the sense of ‘summer’. The picture happily split itself into the legendary ‘thirds’ horizontally with the tree-trunk dead centre vertically.
Sometimes us photographers just get lucky. The
vast majority of professional photographers, of
course, are dedicated to a job they love, and will
wait hours, primed like a hair trigger, for the
perfect shot. While the papparazzi rely on luck as
well as skill for their dinner, the wildlife
photographer has subsumed his whole being to the
pursuit of better pictures of that kingfisher, that
mating earthworm, or the lion in for the kill. But us
lesser mortals can also get a buzz when an
off-the-cuff picture comes out well. On leaving the
venue for the Sheepdog Trials there was a gap in
the crowd wandering over Haughley Park just as I
passed a beautiful row of silver birches. I thought I
saw a picture there, of the tall trees and their shadows making the sort of natural pattern I
particularly like. But in the edit suite later, the picture just wouldn’t resolve into a good
composition. Either I should have got closer and made more of the verticals, or further back
for a long shot, but the exiting crowds would’ve made that difficult. I was rescued by a crop
that eliminated the birches completely in favour of a lone tree off to the right. The subsequent
loss of resolution was disguised by a little diffusion and by introducing some creative
elements that heightened the sense of ‘summer’. The picture happily split itself into the
legendary ‘thirds’ horizontally with the tree-trunk dead centre vertically.

Summer tree

For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Sometimes us photographers just get lucky. The vast majority of professional photographers, of course, are dedicated to a job they love, and will wait hours, primed like a hair trigger, for the perfect shot. While the papparazzi rely on luck as well as skill for their dinner, the wildlife photographer has subsumed his whole being to the pursuit of better pictures of that kingfisher, that mating earthworm, or the lion in for the kill. But us lesser mortals can also get a buzz when an off-the-cuff picture comes out well.  On leaving the venue for the Sheepdog Trials there was a gap in the crowd wandering over Haughley Park just as I passed a beautiful row of silver birches. I thought I saw a picture there, of the tall trees and their shadows making the sort of natural pattern I particularly like.  But in the edit suite later, the picture just wouldn’t resolve into a good composition. Either I should have got closer and made more of the verticals, or further back for a long shot, but the exiting crowds would’ve made that difficult.  I was rescued by a crop that eliminated the birches completely in favour of a lone tree off to the right. The subsequent loss of resolution was disguised by a little diffusion and by introducing some creative elements that heightened the sense of ‘summer’. The picture happily split itself into the legendary ‘thirds’ horizontally with the tree-trunk dead centre vertically.  
A polished dark wood frame works well. Note the mount here is not 'float' mounted.

A polished dark wood frame works well. Note the mount here is not 'float' mounted.

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Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence