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There is a little museum in Dunwich, which
shares space with the Post Office, that
contains a fascinating reconstruction of
the Dunwich of centuries ago. Long before
anyone else knew about rising sea levels
and global warming, the good folk of East
Anglia were well aware of coastal erosion,
as, decade on decade, land was being lost
to the North Sea. It's still going on, and
because of financial constraints, large
parts of the east coast are having to be
sacrificed to a watery grave in order to protect the more valuable parts. The coast
around Dunwich is not one of them, as you can see from the line of trees here about to
fall victim to the next collapse of the cliff edge. Dunwich was once a very important port
and trading town, with its close access to the continent for the export of wool (which
made East Anglia very rich). But the port and most of the original town is now under the
waves, increasingly farther out at sea. Probably too far now to hear the church bell
tolling, as the legend has it.
There is a little museum in Dunwich, which shares space with the Post Office, that
contains a fascinating reconstruction of the Dunwich of centuries ago. Long before
anyone else knew about rising sea levels and global warming, the good folk of East Anglia
were well aware of coastal erosion, as, decade on decade, land was being lost to the
North Sea. It's still going on, and because of financial constraints, large parts of the east
coast are having to be sacrificed to a watery grave in order to protect the more valuable
parts. The coast around Dunwich is not one of them, as you can see from the line of trees
here about to fall victim to the next collapse of the cliff edge. Dunwich was once a very
important port and trading town, with its close access to the continent for the export of
wool (which made East Anglia very rich). But the port and most of the original town is
now under the waves, increasingly farther out at sea. Probably too far now to hear the
church bell tolling, as the legend has it.
There is a little museum in Dunwich, which
shares space with the Post Office, that
contains a fascinating reconstruction of
the Dunwich of centuries ago. Long before
anyone else knew about rising sea levels
and global warming, the good folk of East
Anglia were well aware of coastal erosion,
as, decade on decade, land was being lost
to the North Sea. It's still going on, and
because of financial constraints, large
parts of the east coast are having to be
sacrificed to a watery grave in order to protect the more valuable parts. The coast
around Dunwich is not one of them, as you can see from the line of trees here about to
fall victim to the next collapse of the cliff edge. Dunwich was once a very important port
and trading town, with its close access to the continent for the export of wool (which
made East Anglia very rich). But the port and most of the original town is now under the
waves, increasingly farther out at sea. Probably too far now to hear the church bell
tolling, as the legend has it.

Storm passing, Dunwich


For your own fine-art print of this picture:
There is a little museum in Dunwich, which shares space with the Post Office, that contains a fascinating reconstruction of the Dunwich of centuries ago. Long before anyone else knew about rising sea levels and global warming, the good folk of East Anglia were well aware of coastal erosion, as, decade on decade, land was being lost to the North Sea. It's still going on, and because of financial constraints, large parts of the east coast are having to be sacrificed to a watery grave in order to protect the more valuable parts. The coast around Dunwich is not one of them, as you can see from the line of trees here about to fall victim to the next collapse of the cliff edge. Dunwich was once a very important port and trading town, with its close access to the continent for the export of wool (which made East Anglia very rich). But the port and most of the original town is now under the waves, increasingly farther out at sea. Probably too far now to hear the church bell tolling, as the legend has it.
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