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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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The huge Soviet 'Tomb of the Unknown
Soldier' in Berlin's Tiergarten was known
for many years after the war as the Tomb
of the Unknown Rapist, due to the savage
behaviour of the Russian troops in their
long march, after Stalingrad, to the capital
of the Nazi empire in 1945. Given the
atrocities committed by the German SS and
even the Wehrmacht - the regular army -
during their short stay in Poland, Russia
and the Ukraine, the Red Army's rampage,
which went on for some months after Berlin fell, has been excused by some historians as
understandable.
But this is not that memorial, this is Germany's own Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Sited
in the 19th century Prussian guardhouse known as the Neue Wache, on Unter den Linden
in central Berlin, it now incorporates a memorial to the Unknown Victims of the
concentration camps. The statue is by Käthe Kollwitz, replacing an earlier plinth that had
commemorated the fallen of WW1 and which had become tainted by association with
Nazism. Amid the hurly-burly, a quiet place to reflect on the horrors of the last century.
The huge Soviet 'Tomb of the Unknown Soldier' in Berlin's Tiergarten was known for many
years after the war as the Tomb of the Unknown Rapist, due to the savage behaviour of the
Russian troops in their long march, after Stalingrad, to the capital of the Nazi empire in
1945. Given the atrocities committed by the German SS and even the Wehrmacht - the
regular army - during their short stay in Poland, Russia and the Ukraine, the Red Army's
rampage, which went on for some months after Berlin fell, has been excused by some
historians as understandable.
But this is not that memorial, this is Germany's own Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Sited in
the 19th century Prussian guardhouse known as the Neue Wache, on Unter den Linden in
central Berlin, it now incorporates a memorial to the Unknown Victims of the concentration
camps. The statue is by Käthe Kollwitz, replacing an earlier plinth that had commemorated
the fallen of WW1 and which had become tainted by association with Nazism. Amid the
hurly-burly, a quiet place to reflect on the horrors of the last century.
The huge Soviet 'Tomb of the Unknown
Soldier' in Berlin's Tiergarten was known
for many years after the war as the Tomb
of the Unknown Rapist, due to the savage
behaviour of the Russian troops in their
long march, after Stalingrad, to the capital
of the Nazi empire in 1945. Given the
atrocities committed by the German SS and
even the Wehrmacht - the regular army -
during their short stay in Poland, Russia
and the Ukraine, the Red Army's rampage,
which went on for some months after Berlin fell, has been excused by some historians as
understandable.
But this is not that memorial, this is Germany's own Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Sited
in the 19th century Prussian guardhouse known as the Neue Wache, on Unter den Linden
in central Berlin, it now incorporates a memorial to the Unknown Victims of the
concentration camps. The statue is by Käthe Kollwitz, replacing an earlier plinth that had
commemorated the fallen of WW1 and which had become tainted by association with
Nazism. Amid the hurly-burly, a quiet place to reflect on the horrors of the last century.

Unknown soldier

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For your own fine-art print of this picture:
The huge Soviet 'Tomb of the Unknown Soldier' in Berlin's Tiergarten was known for many years after the war as the Tomb of the Unknown Rapist, due to the savage behaviour of the Russian troops in their long march, after Stalingrad, to the capital of the Nazi empire in 1945.  Given the atrocities committed by the German SS and even the Wehrmacht - the regular army - during their short stay in Poland, Russia and the Ukraine, the Red Army's rampage, which went on for some months after Berlin fell, has been excused by some historians as understandable.

But this is not that memorial, this is Germany's own Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Sited in the 19th century Prussian guardhouse known as the Neue Wache, on Unter den Linden in central Berlin, it now incorporates a memorial to the Unknown Victims of the concentration camps. The statue is by Käthe Kollwitz, replacing an earlier plinth that had commemorated the fallen of WW1 and which had become tainted by association with Nazism.   Amid the hurly-burly, a quiet place to reflect on the horrors of the last century. 
The classic nature of this black frame echoes the sombre mood of the picture

The classic nature of this black frame echoes the sombre mood of the picture

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