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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Just outside Ypres in Belgium, at a place called
Sanctuary Wood, which in WW1 was anything
but a sanctuary, there is a privately run
museum of collected artifacts left over from
the trench warfare. Among a complete
jumble of stuff, shells, grenades, dugout
paraphernalia, you name it, are what I took
to be these trench support poles, just stacked
up against the wall, rusting colourfully away
and looking like a Bridget Riley painting. There are preserved trenches here too, where
the two fronts were within shouting distance of each other. It's a sad, lonely, largely
unvisited spot, where by 1916 the Wood had been replaced by scorched stumps of trees,
the land by a quagmire of mud and blood.
Also here is a room dedicated to the work of a local WW1 photographer working in
stereo images. These are housed in half a dozen or so old Victorian desktop stereo
viewers, which, among many landscapes of utter devastation, reveal some appalling 3D
scenes of wounded combatants. This priceless and virtually unseen material ought to be
regarded as a national treasure. Instead, it's deteriorating and fading away. I've tried to
interest the owners in digitally conserving this precious material, but to no avail. The 3D
viewing machines themselves are also becoming broken and forlorn - a sad end to a
unique archive.
Just outside Ypres in Belgium, at a place called Sanctuary Wood, which in WW1 was
anything but a sanctuary, there is a privately run museum of collected artifacts left over
from the trench warfare. Among a complete jumble of stuff, shells, grenades, dugout
paraphernalia, you name it, are what I took to be these trench support poles, just stacked
up against the wall, rusting colourfully away and looking like a Bridget Riley painting. There
are preserved trenches here too, where the two fronts were within shouting distance of
each other. It's a sad, lonely, largely unvisited spot, where by 1916 the Wood had been
replaced by scorched stumps of trees, the land by a quagmire of mud and blood.
Also here is a room dedicated to the work of a local WW1 photographer working in stereo
images. These are housed in half a dozen or so old Victorian desktop stereo viewers, which,
among many landscapes of utter devastation, reveal some appalling 3D scenes of wounded
combatants. This priceless and virtually unseen material ought to be regarded as a national
treasure. Instead, it's deteriorating and fading away. I've tried to interest the owners in
digitally conserving this precious material, but to no avail. The 3D viewing machines
themselves are also becoming broken and forlorn - a sad end to a unique archive.
Just outside Ypres in Belgium, at a place called
Sanctuary Wood, which in WW1 was anything
but a sanctuary, there is a privately run
museum of collected artifacts left over from
the trench warfare. Among a complete
jumble of stuff, shells, grenades, dugout
paraphernalia, you name it, are what I took
to be these trench support poles, just stacked
up against the wall, rusting colourfully away
and looking like a Bridget Riley painting. There are preserved trenches here too, where
the two fronts were within shouting distance of each other. It's a sad, lonely, largely
unvisited spot, where by 1916 the Wood had been replaced by scorched stumps of trees,
the land by a quagmire of mud and blood.
Also here is a room dedicated to the work of a local WW1 photographer working in
stereo images. These are housed in half a dozen or so old Victorian desktop stereo
viewers, which, among many landscapes of utter devastation, reveal some appalling 3D
scenes of wounded combatants. This priceless and virtually unseen material ought to be
regarded as a national treasure. Instead, it's deteriorating and fading away. I've tried to
interest the owners in digitally conserving this precious material, but to no avail. The 3D
viewing machines themselves are also becoming broken and forlorn - a sad end to a
unique archive.

Sanctuary Wood

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For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Just outside Ypres in Belgium, at a place called Sanctuary Wood, which in WW1 was anything but a sanctuary, there is a privately run museum of collected artifacts left over from the trench warfare.  Among a complete jumble of stuff, shells, grenades, dugout paraphernalia, you name it, are what I took to be these trench support poles, just stacked up against the wall, rusting colourfully away and looking like a Bridget Riley painting.  There are preserved trenches here too, where the two fronts were within shouting distance of each other.  It's a sad, lonely, largely unvisited spot, where by 1916 the Wood had been replaced by scorched stumps of trees, the land by a quagmire of mud and blood.

Also here is a room dedicated to the work of a local WW1 photographer working in stereo images. These are housed in half a dozen or so old Victorian desktop stereo viewers, which, among many landscapes of utter devastation, reveal some appalling 3D scenes of wounded combatants. This priceless and virtually unseen material ought to be regarded as a national treasure. Instead, it's deteriorating and fading away.  I've tried to interest the owners in digitally conserving this precious material, but to no avail. The 3D viewing machines themselves are also becoming broken and forlorn - a sad end to a unique archive.
A neutral mount coupled with a narrow black frame would be my choice for this picture.

A neutral mount coupled with a narrow black frame would be my choice for this picture.

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