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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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British bikes always had a well-deserved
reputation for their unreliability. But until
the industry was lost to the influx of more
reliable types from Japan and to its own
arrogance, it gave generations of bike
owners an excuse to tinker in the garden
shed. Dad's who could only afford a
second-hand bike - and until they began
arriving in numbers from abroad that
would have been a British bike - taught their sons how to replace clutch plates and head
gaskets and how to put the kickstart onto the firing stroke. All good fun, and we're still at
it. The classic looks of an old sloper are still a welcome sight, and yet breaking down is
still part of the game! I sold my beautifully restored 600cc side-valve BSA M21 back in
1976 for £40 (stupid even at the time, but being a bit cash-strapped and wanting to buy
my employer's old mini-van in a hurry, I had no choice). M21s are now rarer than old
mini-vans, and are priced accordingly. So my only option now would be a Royal Enfield
Bullet, still relatively cheap and plentiful, and still being made in India.
British bikes always had a well-deserved reputation for their unreliability. But until the
industry was lost to the influx of more reliable types from Japan and to its own
arrogance, it gave generations of bike owners an excuse to tinker in the garden shed.
Dad's who could only afford a second-hand bike - and until they began arriving in
numbers from abroad that would have been a British bike - taught their sons how to
replace clutch plates and head gaskets and how to put the kickstart onto the firing stroke.
All good fun, and we're still at it. The classic looks of an old sloper are still a welcome
sight, and yet breaking down is still part of the game! I sold my beautifully restored
600cc side-valve BSA M21 back in 1976 for £40 (stupid even at the time, but being a bit
cash-strapped and wanting to buy my employer's old mini-van in a hurry, I had no
choice). M21s are now rarer than old mini-vans, and are priced accordingly. So my only
option now would be a Royal Enfield Bullet, still relatively cheap and plentiful, and still
being made in India.
British bikes always had a well-deserved
reputation for their unreliability. But until
the industry was lost to the influx of more
reliable types from Japan and to its own
arrogance, it gave generations of bike
owners an excuse to tinker in the garden
shed. Dad's who could only afford a
second-hand bike - and until they began
arriving in numbers from abroad that
would have been a British bike - taught their sons how to replace clutch plates and head
gaskets and how to put the kickstart onto the firing stroke. All good fun, and we're still at
it. The classic looks of an old sloper are still a welcome sight, and yet breaking down is
still part of the game! I sold my beautifully restored 600cc side-valve BSA M21 back in
1976 for £40 (stupid even at the time, but being a bit cash-strapped and wanting to buy
my employer's old mini-van in a hurry, I had no choice). M21s are now rarer than old
mini-vans, and are priced accordingly. So my only option now would be a Royal Enfield
Bullet, still relatively cheap and plentiful, and still being made in India.

Royal Envy

For your own fine-art print of this picture:
British bikes always had a well-deserved reputation for their unreliability.  But until the industry was lost to the influx of more reliable types from Japan and to its own arrogance, it gave generations of bike owners an excuse to tinker in the garden shed. Dad's who could only afford a second-hand bike - and until they began arriving in numbers from abroad that would have been a British bike - taught their sons how to replace clutch plates and head gaskets and how to put the kickstart onto the firing stroke. All good fun, and we're still at it. The classic looks of an old sloper are still a welcome sight, and yet  breaking down is still part of the game!  I sold my beautifully restored 600cc side-valve BSA M21 back in 1976 for £40 (stupid even at the time, but being a bit cash-strapped and wanting to buy my employer's old mini-van in a hurry, I had no choice).  M21s are now rarer than old mini-vans, and are priced accordingly.  So my only option now would be a Royal Enfield Bullet, still relatively cheap and plentiful, and still being made in India.       
Looks like a First in Show in this frame!

Looks like a First in Show in this frame!

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Suffolk
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence