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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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One available on discount page (no. 327)
Wimbledon Common at Christmas. Weather
moderate to good. Bright dappled sunlight
through the trees. Wandering off-piste, as I
usually do, I was rewarded by this scene. It
looked as though a school class had had a maths
lesson here, and had been acting out
Pythagoras's theorem. But, typical schoolkids,
they just left everything lying around for
someone else to clear up. Thankfully.
Trees are relatively easy to photograph as long
as they can be isolated from a (usually) messy
background. How many pictures have you seen
of rows of plane trees along French avenues, or
gnarled old oaks standing alone in the middle of
a meadow, or exquisite topiary in an English
country house garden? This is one of my
favourites among my own arboreal output, for
its intriguing design and its chance encounter. Had the fallen branches been arranged
deliberately, had something educational been going on here, has a child suddenly decided
to become a mathematician, or to give up maths completely? We'll never know, but I like
to think that someone now knows what the square on the hypotenuse is.
Wimbledon Common at Christmas. Weather moderate to good. Bright dappled sunlight
through the trees. Wandering off-piste, as I usually do, I was rewarded by this scene. It
looked as though a school class had had a maths lesson here, and had been acting out
Pythagoras's theorem. But, typical schoolkids, they just left everything lying around for
someone else to clear up. Thankfully.
Trees are relatively easy to photograph as long as they can be isolated from a (usually)
messy background. How many pictures have you seen of rows of plane trees along
French avenues, or gnarled old oaks standing alone in the middle of a meadow, or
exquisite topiary in an English country house garden? This is one of my favourites among
my own arboreal output, for its intriguing design and its chance encounter. Had the
fallen branches been arranged deliberately, had something educational been going on
here, has a child suddenly decided to become a mathematician, or to give up maths
completely? We'll never know, but I like to think that someone now knows what the
square on the hypotenuse is.
Wimbledon Common at Christmas. Weather
moderate to good. Bright dappled sunlight
through the trees. Wandering off-piste, as I
usually do, I was rewarded by this scene. It
looked as though a school class had had a maths
lesson here, and had been acting out
Pythagoras's theorem. But, typical schoolkids,
they just left everything lying around for
someone else to clear up. Thankfully.
Trees are relatively easy to photograph as long
as they can be isolated from a (usually) messy
background. How many pictures have you seen
of rows of plane trees along French avenues, or
gnarled old oaks standing alone in the middle of
a meadow, or exquisite topiary in an English
country house garden? This is one of my
favourites among my own arboreal output, for
its intriguing design and its chance encounter. Had the fallen branches been arranged
deliberately, had something educational been going on here, has a child suddenly decided
to become a mathematician, or to give up maths completely? We'll never know, but I like
to think that someone now knows what the square on the hypotenuse is.

The sq. on the hypotenuse...

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Wimbledon Common at Christmas. Weather moderate to good. Bright dappled sunlight through the trees. Wandering off-piste, as I usually do, I was rewarded by this scene. It looked as though a school class had had a maths lesson here, and had been acting out Pythagoras's theorem. But, typical schoolkids, they just left everything lying around for someone else to clear up.  Thankfully.

Trees are relatively easy to photograph as long as they can be isolated from a (usually) messy background. How many pictures have you seen of rows of plane trees along French avenues, or gnarled old oaks standing alone in the middle of a meadow, or exquisite topiary in an English country house garden?  This is one of my favourites among my own arboreal output, for its intriguing design and its chance encounter. Had the fallen branches been arranged deliberately, had something educational been going on here, has a child suddenly decided to become a mathematician, or to give up maths completely? We'll never know, but I like to think that someone now knows what the square on the hypotenuse is.



 
Image is floated inside the mount, with a thin black border to the photograph

Image is floated inside the mount, with a thin black border to the photograph

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