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In my youth, Rome was a lure that was only
(temporarily) satisfied when a mate and I took
off on a motorbike one glorious summer with
the last knockings of our student grants, for a
whistle-stop tour of as many youth hostels as
it took to get from Salisbury - where we were
studying applied photography - to the Eternal
City.
With neither of us budding Ansel Adamses or
Cartier-Bressons, the lost photographic
opportunities don't bear thinking about, and it
was only later in life that more funds and
more experience in photography rescued any
'creative' talent we had. In the meantime,
we've both had jobs in industrial, medical or
aerial photography, and in my case a career
as a film and television cameraman, before
retiring to consider where we went wrong.
Neither of us managed to join that elite club of
photographers who were in the right place at the right time with the right pictures and got
‘noticed.’ Anyway, this photograph of the massive door to the Pantheon is one of the few
that have survived since that early escapade. The third participant on that trip performed
exquisitely: the bike - a 600cc side valve BSA - didn't break down at all, amazingly, and we got
back on time for once.
In my youth, Rome was a lure that was only (temporarily) satisfied when a mate and I took
off on a motorbike one glorious summer with the last knockings of our student grants, for a
whistle-stop tour of as many youth hostels as it took to get from Salisbury - where we were
studying applied photography - to the Eternal City.
With neither of us budding Ansel Adamses or Cartier-Bressons, the lost photographic
opportunities don't bear thinking about, and it was only later in life that more funds and
more experience in photography rescued any 'creative' talent we had. In the meantime,
we've both had jobs in industrial, medical or aerial photography, and in my case a career as
a film and television cameraman, before retiring to consider where we went wrong. Neither
of us managed to join that elite club of photographers who were in the right place at the
right time with the right pictures and got ‘noticed.’ Anyway, this photograph of the massive
door to the Pantheon is one of the few that have survived since that early escapade. The
third participant on that trip performed exquisitely: the bike - a 600cc side valve BSA - didn't
break down at all, amazingly, and we got back on time for once.
In my youth, Rome was a lure that was only
(temporarily) satisfied when a mate and I
took off on a motorbike one glorious summer
with the last knockings of our student grants,
for a whistle-stop tour of as many youth
hostels as it took to get from Salisbury -
where we were studying applied photography
- to the Eternal City.
With neither of us budding Ansel Adamses or
Cartier-Bressons, the lost photographic
opportunities don't bear thinking about, and
it was only later in life that more funds and
more experience in photography rescued any
'creative' talent we had. In the meantime,
we've both had jobs in industrial, medical or
aerial photography, and in my case a career
as a film and television cameraman, before
retiring to consider where we went wrong.
Neither of us managed to join that elite club of photographers who were in the right place at
the right time with the right pictures and got ‘noticed.’ Anyway, this photograph of the
massive door to the Pantheon is one of the few that have survived since that early escapade.
The third participant on that trip performed exquisitely: the bike - a 600cc side valve BSA -
didn't break down at all, amazingly, and we got back on time for once.

Pantheon door, Rome

In my youth, Rome was a lure that was only (temporarily) satisfied when a mate and I took off on a motorbike one glorious summer with the last knockings of our student grants, for a whistle-stop tour of as many youth hostels as it took to get from Salisbury - where we were studying applied photography - to the Eternal City.

With neither of us budding Ansel Adamses or Cartier-Bressons, the lost photographic opportunities don't bear thinking about, and it was only later in life that more funds and more experience in photography rescued any 'creative' talent we had.  In the meantime, we've both had jobs in industrial, medical or aerial photography, and in my case a career as a film and television cameraman, before retiring to consider where we went wrong. Neither of us managed to join that elite club of photographers who were in the right place at the right time with the right pictures and got ‘noticed.’  Anyway, this photograph of the massive door to the Pantheon is one of the few that have survived since that early escapade. The third participant on that trip performed exquisitely: the bike - a 600cc side valve BSA - didn't break down at all, amazingly, and we got back on time for once.

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