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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Torn between the delights of the Suffolk
Food Hall (ie. shopping) and the chance of
another picture of the Orwell Bridge, the
mud won. It's wonderful how our
coastline varies so much, both in its
natural state and in what us humanoids
have done with it. In my native
Hampshire, you can't swing a cat without
hitting a marina full of gin palaces; the
North East is bleak and windswept with
the occasional castle defending a
promontory, the rugged West Country has
its own special charm and still has a small
local fishing industry, and the Suffolk
coast is largely undeveloped with many
small inlets leading nowhere in particular (unless it has a brewery and therefore an
overnight stop-off for a Dutch barge or two). As a result we have, in Suffolk, a lot of
places where you can see coastal wading birds - even a bittern if you're lucky - as the
human impact has been relatively minor. Our heightened inclination to preserve our
coastal heritage, with little industrial pollution, is enshrined in the local psyche, hence the
survival and popularity of places like Pin Mill, a 1950s timegate, just downstream from
the Orwell Bridge here.
Torn between the delights of the Suffolk Food Hall (ie. shopping) and the chance of
another picture of the Orwell Bridge, the mud won. It's wonderful how our coastline
varies so much, both in its natural state and in what us humanoids have done with it. In
my native Hampshire, you can't swing a cat without hitting a marina full of gin palaces;
the North East is bleak and windswept with the occasional castle defending a
promontory, the rugged West Country has its own special charm and still has a small
local fishing industry, and the Suffolk coast is largely undeveloped with many small inlets
leading nowhere in particular (unless it has a brewery and therefore an overnight
stop-off for a Dutch barge or two). As a result we have, in Suffolk, a lot of places where
you can see coastal wading birds - even a bittern if you're lucky - as the human impact
has been relatively minor. Our heightened inclination to preserve our coastal heritage,
with little industrial pollution, is enshrined in the local psyche, hence the survival and
popularity of places like Pin Mill, a 1950s timegate, just downstream from the Orwell
Bridge here.
Torn between the delights of the Suffolk
Food Hall (ie. shopping) and the chance of
another picture of the Orwell Bridge, the
mud won. It's wonderful how our
coastline varies so much, both in its
natural state and in what us humanoids
have done with it. In my native
Hampshire, you can't swing a cat without
hitting a marina full of gin palaces; the
North East is bleak and windswept with
the occasional castle defending a
promontory, the rugged West Country has
its own special charm and still has a small
local fishing industry, and the Suffolk
coast is largely undeveloped with many
small inlets leading nowhere in particular (unless it has a brewery and therefore an
overnight stop-off for a Dutch barge or two). As a result we have, in Suffolk, a lot of
places where you can see coastal wading birds - even a bittern if you're lucky - as the
human impact has been relatively minor. Our heightened inclination to preserve our
coastal heritage, with little industrial pollution, is enshrined in the local psyche, hence the
survival and popularity of places like Pin Mill, a 1950s timegate, just downstream from
the Orwell Bridge here.

River Orwell & Bridge


For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Torn between the delights of the Suffolk Food Hall (ie. shopping) and the chance of another picture of the Orwell Bridge, the mud won. It's wonderful how our coastline varies so much, both in its natural state and in what us humanoids have done with it. In my native Hampshire, you can't swing a cat without hitting a marina full of gin palaces; the North East is bleak and windswept with the occasional castle defending a promontory, the rugged West Country has its own special charm and still has a small local fishing industry, and the Suffolk coast is largely undeveloped with many small inlets leading nowhere in particular (unless it has a brewery and therefore an overnight stop-off for a Dutch barge or two).  As a result we have, in Suffolk, a lot of places where you can see coastal wading birds - even a bittern if you're lucky - as the human impact has been relatively minor.  Our heightened inclination to preserve our coastal heritage, with little industrial pollution, is enshrined in the local psyche, hence the survival and popularity of places like Pin Mill, a 1950s timegate, just downstream from the Orwell Bridge here.               
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Suffolk
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence