PICTURESONLINE
PICTURESONLINE
For your own fine-art print of this picture:
For your own fine-art print of this picture:
For a framing suggestion, please see tablet or desktop version of this page
For a fine-art print of this picture:
(roll over the image for a framing suggestion)
(mouse-over the image for a framing suggestion)
(tap picture for a framing idea)
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
Terms & Conditions     Privacy Policy     FAQ     Print information
Purchasing     Contact     Guestbook     About     Sitemap     Links
Terms & Conditions     Privacy Policy     FAQ     Print information

Purchasing     Contact     Guestbook     About     Sitemap     Links
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
     Two available on discount page (No.s 251-252)

£ 0.00

Add to Cart (0) Go to cart
There's not a lot to do in Whitehorse, Yukon
Territory, once you've checked out the mall
and the three-storey log cabin and the
preserved paddle steamers from Gold Rush
days (which, were torched by an arsonist a
few years ago and destroyed). And there's not
a lot to do in Fairbanks, Alaska, either,
assuming you're not at the University and
have already been to the cod 'North Pole'
tourist trap out of town, and seen the oil
pipeline from Prudhoe Bay on the Arctic
Ocean.
Which makes it all the more surprising that I
can't remember where I took this picture of an Athabaskan Indian fish-drying shed: was
it on the banks of the Yukon River or the Nenana R. in central Alaska? Either way it was
on one of the native Indian settlements that you're inevitably taken to and from which
you're expected to buy trinkets or quiviut boots (proper mukluks). So if you go, opt for a
river trip on a restored sternwheeler, in our case the 'Discovery', memorable for its
seating area surrounded by hundreds of bright red life jackets, just in case. With an old
timer with missing fingers on the boat's piano, you can relieve the boredom for a few
happy hours by pretending you're on your way to the Klondike....
There's not a lot to do in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, once you've checked out the mall
and the three-storey log cabin and the preserved paddle steamers from Gold Rush days
(which, were torched by an arsonist a few years ago and destroyed). And there's not a lot
to do in Fairbanks, Alaska, either, assuming you're not at the University and have
already been to the cod 'North Pole' tourist trap out of town, and seen the oil pipeline
from Prudhoe Bay on the Arctic Ocean.
Which makes it all the more surprising that I can't remember where I took this picture of
an Athabaskan Indian fish-drying shed: was it on the banks of the Yukon River or the
Nenana R. in central Alaska? Either way it was on one of the native Indian settlements
that you're inevitably taken to and from which you're expected to buy trinkets or quiviut
boots (proper mukluks). So if you go, opt for a river trip on a restored sternwheeler, in
our case the 'Discovery', memorable for its seating area surrounded by hundreds of
bright red life jackets, just in case. With an old timer with missing fingers on the boat's
piano, you can relieve the boredom for a few happy hours by pretending you're on your
way to the Klondike....
There's not a lot to do in Whitehorse, Yukon
Territory, once you've checked out the mall
and the three-storey log cabin and the
preserved paddle steamers from Gold Rush
days (which, were torched by an arsonist a
few years ago and destroyed). And there's not
a lot to do in Fairbanks, Alaska, either,
assuming you're not at the University and
have already been to the cod 'North Pole'
tourist trap out of town, and seen the oil
pipeline from Prudhoe Bay on the Arctic
Ocean.
Which makes it all the more surprising that I
can't remember where I took this picture of an Athabaskan Indian fish-drying shed: was
it on the banks of the Yukon River or the Nenana R. in central Alaska? Either way it was
on one of the native Indian settlements that you're inevitably taken to and from which
you're expected to buy trinkets or quiviut boots (proper mukluks). So if you go, opt for a
river trip on a restored sternwheeler, in our case the 'Discovery', memorable for its
seating area surrounded by hundreds of bright red life jackets, just in case. With an old
timer with missing fingers on the boat's piano, you can relieve the boredom for a few
happy hours by pretending you're on your way to the Klondike....

Native hut, Alaska

There's not a lot to do in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, once you've checked out the mall and the three-storey log cabin and the preserved paddle steamers from Gold Rush days (which, were torched by an arsonist a few years ago and destroyed). And there's not a lot to do in Fairbanks, Alaska, either, assuming you're not at the University and have already been to the cod 'North Pole' tourist trap out of town, and seen the oil pipeline from Prudhoe Bay on the Arctic Ocean.  
 
Which makes it all the more surprising that I can't remember where I took this picture of an Athabaskan Indian fish-drying shed: was it on the banks of the Yukon River or the Nenana R. in central Alaska? Either way it was on one of the native Indian settlements that you're inevitably taken to and from which you're expected to buy trinkets or quiviut boots (proper mukluks).  So if you go, opt for a river trip on a restored sternwheeler, in our case the 'Discovery', memorable for its seating area surrounded by hundreds of bright red life jackets, just in case. With an old timer with missing fingers on the boat's piano, you can relieve the boredom for a few happy hours by pretending you're on your way to the Klondike....
          
A black and white picture is best supported by a black and white framed

A black and white picture is best supported by a black and white framed

For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Send to a friend
Black & whites
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence