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It's a sign of our increasingly manic 'progress' since the industrial revolution that the vast majority of the bridges that cross the Thames, either in London itself or even the outer reaches like Kingston and Twickenham have been built in the last two hundred years, when the gap between the first, Roman, bridge (Londinium) of around 50 AD and the next, Westminster, was a colossal 1700 years.  With the contentious 'Garden Bridge' now little more than an ongoing pipe-dream of a very few (as well as a huge waste of public funds), the latest is still the Millennium Bridge of 2002, connecting Bankside and the Tate Gallery with the St Paul's area, at the western end of the true 'City' of London, the original square mile.  This bridge carries no more traffic than the humble human being and his bicycle. And now that the famous 'wobble' has been eliminated from the perils of crossing it, it allows a pleasant stroll from one side of the river to the other.  Its open structure encourages people to stop and take in the river itself as few other London bridges do.

This abstract image is of the bracing structure at the Bankside end of the bridge, but I don't know if these struts were there beforehand or as a result of the bridge's closure for remedial work to prevent the wobble. 


It's a sign of our increasingly manic
'progress' since the industrial revolution
that the vast majority of the bridges that
cross the Thames, either in London itself
or even the outer reaches like Kingston
and Twickenham have been built in the
last two hundred years, when the gap
between the first, Roman, bridge
(Londinium) of around 50 AD and the
next, Westminster, was a colossal 1700
years. With the contentious 'Garden Bridge' now little more than an ongoing
pipe-dream of a very few (as well as a huge waste of public funds), the latest is still the
Millennium Bridge of 2002, connecting Bankside and the Tate Gallery with the St Paul's
area, at the western end of the true 'City' of London, the original square mile. This
bridge carries no more traffic than the humble human being and his bicycle. And now
that the famous 'wobble' has been eliminated from the perils of crossing it, it allows a
pleasant stroll from one side of the river to the other. Its open structure encourages
people to stop and take in the river itself as few other London bridges do.
This abstract image is of the bracing structure at the Bankside end of the bridge, but I
don't know if these struts were there beforehand or as a result of the bridge's closure
for remedial work to prevent the wobble.
It's a sign of our increasingly manic 'progress' since the industrial revolution that the vast majority of the bridges that cross the Thames, either in London itself or even the outer reaches like Kingston and Twickenham have
been built in the last two hundred years, when the gap between the first, Roman, bridge (Londinium) of around 50 AD and the next, Westminster, was a colossal 1700 years. With the contentious 'Garden Bridge' now little
more than an ongoing pipe-dream of a very few (as well as a huge waste of public funds), the latest is still the Millennium Bridge of 2002, connecting Bankside and the Tate Gallery with the St Paul's area, at the western end
of the true 'City' of London, the original square mile. This bridge carries no more traffic than the humble human being and his bicycle. And now that the famous 'wobble' has been eliminated from the perils of crossing it, it
allows a pleasant stroll from one side of the river to the other. Its open structure encourages people to stop and take in the river itself as few other London bridges do.
This abstract image is of the bracing structure at the Bankside end of the bridge, but I don't know if these struts were there beforehand or as a result of the bridge's closure for remedial work to prevent the wobble.
It's a sign of our increasingly manic
'progress' since the industrial revolution
that the vast majority of the bridges that
cross the Thames, either in London itself or
even the outer reaches like Kingston and
Twickenham have been built in the last two
hundred years, when the gap between the
first, Roman, bridge (Londinium) of around
50 AD and the next, Westminster, was a
colossal 1700 years. With the contentious
'Garden Bridge' now little more than an
ongoing pipe-dream of a very few (as well as a huge waste of public funds), the latest is
still the Millennium Bridge of 2002, connecting Bankside and the Tate Gallery with the St
Paul's area, at the western end of the true 'City' of London, the original square mile. This
bridge carries no more traffic than the humble human being and his bicycle. And now that
the famous 'wobble' has been eliminated from the perils of crossing it, it allows a
pleasant stroll from one side of the river to the other. Its open structure encourages
people to stop and take in the river itself as few other London bridges do.
This abstract image is of the bracing structure at the Bankside end of the bridge, but I
don't know if these struts were there beforehand or as a result of the bridge's closure for
remedial work to prevent the wobble.

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Millennium Bridge

It's a sign, I suppose, of our increasingly manic 'progress' since the industrial revolution that the vast majority of the bridges that cross the Thames, either in London itself or even the outer reaches like Kingston and Twickenham have been built in the last two hundred years, when the gap between the first, Roman, bridge (Londinium) of around 50 AD and the next, Westminster, was a colossal 1700 years.  With the contentious 'Garden Bridge' now little more than an ongoing pipe-dream of a very few (as well as a huge waste of public funds), the latest is still the Millennium Bridge of 2002, connecting Bankside and the Tate Gallery with the St Paul's area, at the western end of the true 'City' of London, the original square mile.  This bridge carries no more traffic than the humble human being and his bicycle. And now that the famous 'wobble' has been eliminated from the perils of crossing it, it allows a pleasant stroll from one side of the river to the other.  Its open structure encourages people to stop and take in the river itself as few other London bridges do.

This abstract image is of the bracing structure at the Bankside end of the bridge, but I don't know if these struts were there beforehand or as a result of the bridge's closure for remedial work to prevent the wobble.

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It's a sign of our increasingly manic 'progress' since the industrial revolution that the vast majority of the bridges that cross the Thames, either in London itself or even the outer reaches like Kingston and Twickenham have been built in the last two hundred years, when the gap between the first, Roman, bridge (Londinium) of around 50 AD and the next, Westminster, was a colossal 1700 years.  With the contentious 'Garden Bridge' now little more than an ongoing pipe-dream of a very few (as well as a huge waste of public funds), the latest is still the Millennium Bridge of 2002, connecting Bankside and the Tate Gallery with the St Paul's area, at the western end of the true 'City' of London, the original square mile.  This bridge carries no more traffic than the humble human being and his bicycle. And now that the famous 'wobble' has been eliminated from the perils of crossing it, it allows a pleasant stroll from one side of the river to the other.  Its open structure encourages people to stop and take in the river itself as few other London bridges do.

This abstract image is of the bracing structure at the Bankside end of the bridge, but I don't know if these struts were there beforehand or as a result of the bridge's closure for remedial work to prevent the wobble. 
A grey mount and a white frame can be a nice, restful combination

A grey mount and a white frame can be a nice, restful combination

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