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I was wrong on several accounts about this
bridge. Firstly, because Brunel built much
of the early rail network that connected
the capital with the West Country, I'd
assumed he'd built this one too (it was
Thomas Telford); secondly that it was
never for road, only rail, access (wrong: it
carries the A5 to Holyhead; the nearby
Britannia Bridge carries road and rail
traffic); thirdly that it was never for foot
passengers, which turned out to be wrong
because when it was built (in 1826) it pre-dated rail and was only used for foot
passengers and horse-drawn carriages; and fourthly, that it is called the Menai Bridge,
when properly speaking it's called the Menai Suspension Bridge, and 'Menai Bridge'
actually refers to the small town at its northern edge. Anyway, I'm a photographer, not
an historian. How many historians do you know that take pictures in infra-red, like this
one?
Infra-red photography is a bit of a black art (or black and white art, if you don't mind the
pun) in that you have to choose the subject carefully and give more than usual attention
to the colour and quality of the light. It works best when infra-red radiation (as light, not
heat) is reflected by stone-clad buildings (as here), foliage (especially in summer), blue
skies, etc. and, in my view, only works as black and white conversions (you get a red
negative). I don't like the false look of colour infra-red, but it's very useful as an applied
photography tool (photo-microscopy, petri dishes, aerial land-use photography, etc).
I was wrong on several accounts about this bridge. Firstly, because Brunel built much of
the early rail network that connected the capital with the West Country, I'd assumed
he'd built this one too (it was Thomas Telford); secondly that it was never for road, only
rail, access (wrong: it carries the A5 to Holyhead; the nearby Britannia Bridge carries
road and rail traffic); thirdly that it was never for foot passengers, which turned out to
be wrong because when it was built (in 1826) it pre-dated rail and was only used for foot
passengers and horse-drawn carriages; and fourthly, that it is called the Menai Bridge,
when properly speaking it's called the Menai Suspension Bridge, and 'Menai Bridge'
actually refers to the small town at its northern edge. Anyway, I'm a photographer, not
an historian. How many historians do you know that take pictures in infra-red, like this
one?
Infra-red photography is a bit of a black art (or black and white art, if you don't mind the
pun) in that you have to choose the subject carefully and give more than usual attention
to the colour and quality of the light. It works best when infra-red radiation (as light, not
heat) is reflected by stone-clad buildings (as here), foliage (especially in summer), blue
skies, etc. and, in my view, only works as black and white conversions (you get a red
negative). I don't like the false look of colour infra-red, but it's very useful as an applied
photography tool (photo-microscopy, petri dishes, aerial land-use photography, etc).
I was wrong on several accounts about this
bridge. Firstly, because Brunel built much
of the early rail network that connected
the capital with the West Country, I'd
assumed he'd built this one too (it was
Thomas Telford); secondly that it was
never for road, only rail, access (wrong: it
carries the A5 to Holyhead; the nearby
Britannia Bridge carries road and rail
traffic); thirdly that it was never for foot
passengers, which turned out to be wrong
because when it was built (in 1826) it pre-dated rail and was only used for foot
passengers and horse-drawn carriages; and fourthly, that it is called the Menai Bridge,
when properly speaking it's called the Menai Suspension Bridge, and 'Menai Bridge'
actually refers to the small town at its northern edge. Anyway, I'm a photographer, not
an historian. How many historians do you know that take pictures in infra-red, like this
one?
Infra-red photography is a bit of a black art (or black and white art, if you don't mind the
pun) in that you have to choose the subject carefully and give more than usual attention
to the colour and quality of the light. It works best when infra-red radiation (as light, not
heat) is reflected by stone-clad buildings (as here), foliage (especially in summer), blue
skies, etc. and, in my view, only works as black and white conversions (you get a red
negative). I don't like the false look of colour infra-red, but it's very useful as an applied
photography tool (photo-microscopy, petri dishes, aerial land-use photography, etc).

Menai Bridge

I was wrong on several accounts about this bridge. Firstly, because Brunel built much of the early rail network that connected the capital with the West Country, I'd assumed he'd built this one too (it was Thomas Telford); secondly that it was never for road, only rail, access (wrong: it carries the A5 to Holyhead; the nearby Britannia Bridge carries road and rail traffic); thirdly that it was never for foot passengers, which turned out to be wrong because when it was built (in 1826) it pre-dated rail and was only used for foot passengers and horse-drawn carriages; and fourthly, that it is called the Menai Bridge, when properly speaking it's called the Menai Suspension Bridge, and 'Menai Bridge' actually refers to the small town at its northern edge.  Anyway, I'm a photographer, not an historian.  How many historians do you know that take pictures in infra-red, like this one? 
Infra-red photography is a bit of a black art (or black and white art, if you don't mind the pun) in that you have to choose the subject carefully and give more than usual attention to the colour and quality of the light.  It works best when infra-red radiation (as light, not heat) is reflected by stone-clad buildings (as here), foliage (especially in summer), blue skies, etc. and, in my view, only works as black and white conversions (you get a red negative).  I don't like the false look of colour infra-red, but it's very useful as an applied photography tool (photo-microscopy, petri dishes, aerial land-use photography, etc).     

 

 
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