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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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This photograph is a few years old now,
so I admit that the London skyline may
have changed a bit since I took it in the
early 2000s, but it's still a favourite of
London at night, taken from Waterloo
Bridge after a very pleasant walk along
the South embankment (I think it's
actually called the Queen Elizabeth
Walk) to Waterloo Bridge and the 159
bus home. It was practically the first
picture I took with a new Olympus E-30
and a 10-60mm F/2.8 Zuiko lens, and being relatively unfamiliar with the camera, I
left everything on auto. Having been a film and video lighting-cameraman for many
years, I was very practiced at hand-holding (I once had to hand-hold a heavy
broadcast camera for four hours to relay a live operation to a clinical audience
elsewhere in the hospital. The backache and muscle cramps were only temporarily
relieved by changing the shot occasionally to shoot the surgeons and theatre nurses).
So this night shot was hand-held as well; in fact on very few of the photographs on this
site have I actually employed a tripod - they slow you down and get in the way, and to
often commit you to a viewpoint which later turns out to be unsatisfactory.
This photograph is a few years old now, so I admit that the London skyline may have
changed a bit since I took it in the early 2000s, but it's still a favourite of London at
night, taken from Waterloo Bridge after a very pleasant walk along the South
embankment (I think it's actually called the Queen Elizabeth Walk) to Waterloo Bridge
and the 159 bus home. It was practically the first picture I took with a new Olympus
E-30 and a 10-60mm F/2.8 Zuiko lens, and being relatively unfamiliar with the
camera, I left everything on auto. Having been a film and video lighting-cameraman
for many years, I was very practiced at hand-holding (I once had to hand-hold a heavy
broadcast camera for four hours to relay a live operation to a clinical audience
elsewhere in the hospital. The backache and muscle cramps were only temporarily
relieved by changing the shot occasionally to shoot the surgeons and theatre nurses).
So this night shot was hand-held as well; in fact on very few of the photographs on this
site have I actually employed a tripod - they slow you down and get in the way, and to
often commit you to a viewpoint which later turns out to be unsatisfactory.
This photograph is a few years old now, so I
admit that the London skyline may have
changed a bit since I took it in the early
2000s, but it's still a favourite of London at
night, taken from Waterloo Bridge after a
very pleasant walk along the South
embankment (I think it's actually called the
Queen Elizabeth Walk) to Waterloo Bridge
and the 159 bus home. It was practically
the first picture I took with a new Olympus
E-30 and a 10-60mm F/2.8 Zuiko lens, and
being relatively unfamiliar with the camera, I left everything on auto. Having been a film
and video lighting-cameraman for many years, I was very practiced at hand-holding (I
once had to hand-hold a heavy broadcast camera for four hours to relay a live operation
to a clinical audience elsewhere in the hospital. The backache and muscle cramps were
only temporarily relieved by changing the shot occasionally to shoot the surgeons and
theatre nurses). So this night shot was hand-held as well; in fact on very few of the
photographs on this site have I actually employed a tripod - they slow you down and get in
the way, and to often commit you to a viewpoint which later turns out to be
unsatisfactory.

London at night

This photograph is a few years old now, so I admit that the London skyline may have changed a bit since I took it in the early 2000s, but it's still a favourite of London at night, taken from Waterloo Bridge after a very pleasant walk along the South embankment (I think it's actually called the Queen Elizabeth Walk) to Waterloo Bridge and the 159 bus home.  It was practically the first picture I took with a new Olympus E-30 and a 10-60mm F/2.8 Zuiko lens, and being relatively unfamiliar with the camera, I left everything on auto. Having been a film and video lighting-cameraman for many years, I was very practiced at hand-holding (I once had to hand-hold a heavy broadcast camera for four hours to relay a live operation to a clinical audience elsewhere in the hospital. The backache and muscle cramps were only temporarily relieved by changing the shot occasionally to shoot the surgeons and theatre nurses). So this night shot was hand-held as well; in fact on very few of the photographs on this site have I actually employed a tripod - they slow you down and get in the way, and to often commit you to a viewpoint which later turns out to be unsatisfactory.               
For your own fine-art print of this picture:
This white mount/ black frame scenario echoes the contrasts in the image

This white mount/ black frame scenario echoes the contrasts in the image

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