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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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These cranes on the expensive side of
Ipswich Marina are used, I presume, to lift
big yachts and gin palaces out of the
water for their annual scrape. But in
winter they're not exactly over-used, and
by the end of the day when the boat crews
have gone to the Nelson for a swift one
before bedtime, and the sun has sunk into
the west, the lone floodlight comes on to
illuminate (not much of) the dockside.
Only photographers and smokers lurk at this time of day, both social pariahs: one
filling up his memory card and one filling up his lungs. It's a pity this 'magic hour' is so
short - one never seems to be able to get there in time.
It's said that Nestor Almendros, the great Cuban cinematographer, when working on
Terence Malick's 'Days of Heaven' in 1978 only shot during the 'magic- or golden- hour'
- just after sunset when the set was lit by the soft glow from the sky but without the
hard shadows of sunlight. The film is exquisite to look at, but I doubt the story can be
true - it would have been phenomenally expensive, a bit like some of the yachts that
you can see in the Ipswich Marina.
These cranes on the expensive side of Ipswich Marina are used, I presume, to lift big
yachts and gin palaces out of the water for their annual scrape. But in winter they're
not exactly over-used, and by the end of the day when the boat crews have gone to the
Nelson for a swift one before bedtime, and the sun has sunk into the west, the lone
floodlight comes on to illuminate (not much of) the dockside. Only photographers and
smokers lurk at this time of day, both social pariahs: one filling up his memory card and
one filling up his lungs. It's a pity this 'magic hour' is so short - one never seems to be
able to get there in time.
It's said that Nestor Almendros, the great Cuban cinematographer, when working on
Terence Malick's 'Days of Heaven' in 1978 only shot during the 'magic- or golden- hour'
- just after sunset when the set was lit by the soft glow from the sky but without the
hard shadows of sunlight. The film is exquisite to look at, but I doubt the story can be
true - it would have been phenomenally expensive, a bit like some of the yachts that
you can see in the Ipswich Marina.
These cranes on the expensive side of
Ipswich Marina are used, I presume, to lift
big yachts and gin palaces out of the
water for their annual scrape. But in
winter they're not exactly over-used, and
by the end of the day when the boat crews
have gone to the Nelson for a swift one
before bedtime, and the sun has sunk into
the west, the lone floodlight comes on to
illuminate (not much of) the dockside.
Only photographers and smokers lurk at this time of day, both social pariahs: one
filling up his memory card and one filling up his lungs. It's a pity this 'magic hour' is so
short - one never seems to be able to get there in time.
It's said that Nestor Almendros, the great Cuban cinematographer, when working on
Terence Malick's 'Days of Heaven' in 1978 only shot during the 'magic- or golden- hour'
- just after sunset when the set was lit by the soft glow from the sky but without the
hard shadows of sunlight. The film is exquisite to look at, but I doubt the story can be
true - it would have been phenomenally expensive, a bit like some of the yachts that
you can see in the Ipswich Marina.

Sentinel

A pale blue mount would work just as well as a white one with the black frame

A pale blue mount would work just as well as a white one with the black frame

For your own fine-art print of this picture:
These cranes on the expensive side of Ipswich Marina are used, I presume, to lift big yachts and gin palaces out of the water for their annual scrape.  But in winter they're not exactly over-used, and by the end of the day when the boat crews have gone to the Nelson for a swift one before bedtime, and the sun has sunk into the west, the lone floodlight comes on to illuminate (not much of) the dockside.  Only photographers and smokers lurk at this time of day, both social pariahs: one filling up his memory card and one filling up his lungs. It's a pity this 'magic hour' is so short - one never seems to be able to get there in time.

It's said that Nestor Almendros, the great Cuban cinematographer, when working on Terence Malick's 'Days of Heaven' in 1978 only shot during the 'magic- or golden- hour' - just after sunset when the set was lit by the soft glow from the sky but without the hard shadows of sunlight.  The film is exquisite to look at, but I doubt the story can be true - it would have been phenomenally expensive, a bit like some of the yachts that you can see in the Ipswich Marina.
A pale blue mount would work just as well as a white one with the black frame

A pale blue mount would work just as well as a white one with the black frame

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Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence