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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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If you can tear yourself away from the
pleasant ambience of the Ship Inn at
Levington, there's a pleasant walk along the
shore of the Stour to Harkstead. With a
dramatic sky looming, this lone tree lured me
into a IR shot (the Mrs thinks I've faked the
sky - I haven't). This opened up an interesting
argument about what constitutes a fake in
photography. Do the great photographers -
who often don't do their own printing - get
accused of fakery when they 'dodge and
burn' to get the image they want? Lartigues made wonderfully eccentric pictures without
resorting to fakery, and Doisneau’s famous street kiss was staged a number of times before
he was happy with the result. It has the intended look of spontaneity about it, but it’s
hardly a fake in our terms. The famous image of soldiers raising the US flag on Mt Suribachi
on Iwo Jima was re-enacted (ie. faked) for the camera, as was the meeting of the Russian
and US troops on the Elbe in 1945. We know that for the sake of the storytelling, facts often
get overlooked by the need for impact, but when an entire movie is predicated on the lie
that it was an American submarine that captured an enigma machine in WW2 (in ‘U571’),
who knows when the fakery and the misinformation will stop. For the record, this picture is
100% genuine!
If you can tear yourself away from the pleasant ambience of the Ship Inn at Levington,
there's a pleasant walk along the shore of the Stour to Harkstead. With a dramatic sky
looming, this lone tree lured me into a IR shot (the Mrs thinks I've faked the sky - I
haven't). This opened up an interesting argument about what constitutes a fake in
photography. Do the great photographers - who often don't do their own printing - get
accused of fakery when they 'dodge and burn' to get the image they want? Lartigues
made wonderfully eccentric pictures without resorting to fakery, and Doisneau’s famous
street kiss was staged a number of times before he was happy with the result. It has the
intended look of spontaneity about it, but it’s hardly a fake in our terms. The famous
image of soldiers raising the US flag on Mt Suribachi on Iwo Jima was re-enacted (ie.
faked) for the camera, as was the meeting of the Russian and US troops on the Elbe in
1945. We know that for the sake of the storytelling, facts often get overlooked by the
need for impact, but when an entire movie is predicated on the lie that it was an
American submarine that captured an enigma machine in WW2 (in ‘U571’), who knows
when the fakery and the misinformation will stop. For the record, this picture is 100%
genuine!
If you can tear yourself away from the
pleasant ambience of the Ship Inn at
Levington, there's a pleasant walk along
the shore of the Stour to Harkstead. With
a dramatic sky looming, this lone tree
lured me into a IR shot (the Mrs thinks I've
faked the sky - I haven't). This opened up
an interesting argument about what
constitutes a fake in photography. Do the
great photographers - who often don't do
their own printing - get accused of fakery
when they 'dodge and burn' to get the image they want? Lartigues made wonderfully
eccentric pictures without resorting to fakery, and Doisneau’s famous street kiss was
staged a number of times before he was happy with the result. It has the intended look
of spontaneity about it, but it’s hardly a fake in our terms. The famous image of soldiers
raising the US flag on Mt Suribachi on Iwo Jima was re-enacted (ie. faked) for the camera,
as was the meeting of the Russian and US troops on the Elbe in 1945. We know that for
the sake of the storytelling, facts often get overlooked by the need for impact, but when
an entire movie is predicated on the lie that it was an American submarine that captured
an enigma machine in WW2 (in ‘U571’), who knows when the fakery and the
misinformation will stop. For the record, this picture is 100% genuine!

Infra-red tree

If you can tear yourself away from the pleasant ambience of the Ship Inn at Levington, there's a pleasant walk along the shore of the Stour to Harkstead.  With a dramatic sky looming, this lone tree lured me into a IR shot (the Mrs thinks I've faked the sky - I haven't). This opened up an interesting argument about what constitutes a fake in photography. Do the great photographers - who often don't do their own printing - get accused of fakery when they 'dodge and burn' to get the image they want?  Lartigues made wonderfully eccentric pictures without resorting to fakery, and Doisneau’s famous street kiss was staged a number of times before he was happy with the result. It has the intended look of spontaneity about it, but it’s hardly a fake in our terms. The famous image of soldiers raising the US flag on Mt Suribachi on Iwo Jima was re-enacted (ie. faked) for the camera, as was the meeting of the Russian and US  troops on the Elbe in 1945. We know that for the sake of the storytelling, facts often get overlooked by the need for impact, but when an entire movie is predicated on the lie that it was an American submarine that captured an enigma machine in WW2 (in ‘U571’), who knows when the fakery and the misinformation will stop.  For the record, this picture is 100% genuine!

 

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