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Calving glaciers produce icebergs, and
tides and currents sweep them out to
sea and into shippping lanes, as the
Titanic discovered in 1912. However, in
virtually closed systems like Glacier
Bay, they commonly end up on the
shoreline instead, at least until the
following tide. When working at
Nunatak Cove in Glacier Bay, we would
wake up each morning to a different
display of beached bergs, mainly from Riggs and Muir Glaciers.
The P&O ship 'Sun Princess' would often interrupt their cruise in the Bay to supply our
expedition with whisky, newspapers, chocolate eclairs, etc. The Purser came from the
same town in the NE as our expedition leader, and saw an item about us in the local
paper. Their generosity kept our spirits up when they had perchance flagged (three
months under canvas, remote from anywhere with beer, often raining, risk of bears,
etc). It also provided the ship's passengers with impromptu entertainment as we
pootled out to mid-bay (avoiding icebergs) to collect the goodies. During our final
week in the Bay, Captain Bradshaw and his crew treated us smelly oiks to a day on
the ship where we were fed like kings, had decent showers and a professional haircut.
We visited most areas of the ship, bridge, engine room etc. and were half drunk by
7.00 am. Back on shore, we watched the ship depart the Bay at 5.00pm as the rain
clouds rolled in again.
Calving glaciers produce icebergs, and tides and currents sweep them out to sea and into
shippping lanes, as the Titanic discovered in 1912. However, in virtually closed systems
like Glacier Bay, they commonly end up on the shoreline instead, at least until the
following tide. When working at Nunatak Cove in Glacier Bay, we would wake up each
morning to a different display of beached bergs, mainly from Riggs and Muir Glaciers.
The P&O ship 'Sun Princess' would often interrupt their cruise in the Bay to supply our
expedition with whisky, newspapers, chocolate eclairs, etc. The Purser came from the
same town in the NE as our expedition leader, and saw an item about us in the local
paper. Their generosity kept our spirits up when they had perchance flagged (three
months under canvas, remote from anywhere with beer, often raining, risk of bears, etc).
It also provided the ship's passengers with impromptu entertainment as we pootled out
to mid-bay (avoiding icebergs) to collect the goodies. During our final week in the Bay,
Captain Bradshaw and his crew treated us smelly oiks to a day on the ship where we
were fed like kings, had decent showers and a professional haircut. We visited most
areas of the ship, bridge, engine room etc. and were half drunk by 7.00 am. Back on
shore, we watched the ship depart the Bay at 5.00pm as the rain clouds rolled in again.
Calving glaciers produce icebergs, and tides
and currents sweep them out to sea and
into shippping lanes, as the Titanic
discovered in 1912. However, in virtually
closed systems like Glacier Bay, they
commonly end up on the shoreline instead,
at least until the following tide. When
working at Nunatak Cove in Glacier Bay, we
would wake up each morning to a different
display of beached bergs, mainly from Riggs
and Muir Glaciers.
The P&O ship 'Sun Princess' would often interrupt their cruise in the Bay to supply our
expedition with whisky, newspapers, chocolate eclairs, etc. The Purser came from the
same town in the NE as our expedition leader, and saw an item about us in the local paper.
Their generosity kept our spirits up when they had perchance flagged (three months under
canvas, remote from anywhere with beer, often raining, risk of bears, etc). It also provided
the ship's passengers with impromptu entertainment as we pootled out to mid-bay
(avoiding icebergs) to collect the goodies. During our final week in the Bay, Captain
Bradshaw and his crew treated us smelly oiks to a day on the ship where we were fed like
kings, had decent showers and a professional haircut. We visited most areas of the ship,
bridge, engine room etc. and were half drunk by 7.00 am. Back on shore, we watched the
ship depart the Bay at 5.00pm as the rain clouds rolled in again.

On the rocks

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Calving glaciers produce icebergs, and tides and currents sweep them out to sea and into shippping  lanes, as the Titanic discovered in 1912.  However, in virtually closed systems like Glacier Bay, they commonly end up on the shoreline instead, at least until the following tide.  When working at Nunatak Cove in Glacier Bay, we would wake up each morning to a different display of beached bergs, mainly from Riggs and Muir Glaciers.

The P&O ship 'Sun Princess' would often interrupt their cruise in the Bay to supply our expedition with whisky, newspapers, chocolate eclairs, etc.  The Purser came from the same town in the NE as our expedition leader, and saw an item about us in the local paper. Their generosity kept our spirits up when they had perchance flagged (three months under canvas, remote from anywhere with beer, often raining, risk of bears, etc). It also provided the ship's passengers with impromptu entertainment as we pootled out to mid-bay (avoiding icebergs) to collect the goodies.  During our final week in the Bay, Captain Bradshaw and his crew treated us smelly oiks to a day on the ship where we were fed like kings, had decent showers and a professional haircut. We visited most areas of the ship, bridge, engine room etc. and were half drunk by 7.00 am. Back on shore, we watched the ship depart the Bay at 5.00pm as the rain clouds rolled in again.
mh020 Beached iceberg, Alaska
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