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As the massive sheet of ice that covered
what later became Alaska's 'Glacier Bay'
retreated, some 16 tidal glaciers defined
the geography of the place and became
the subject of intense geological and
biological study. On land, in the course of
their retreat, the glaciers would
sometimes fracture, leaving behind huge
blocks of ice to slowly melt. Depending on
their size, shape and orientation, these
remnants would often produce ice caves as the surface melted at differential rates.
Here is an ice cave that once existed in Tarr Inlet, the western arm of the Bay: an
exterior shot that looks like rock, the outer top of a cavernous hole inside. Parks
personnel told us afterwards that it was extremely dangerous to venture into unstable
ice caves, as they could collapse without warning at any time. This remnant cave
actually did disintegrate about two weeks after we'd been filming in it. Our film was
about the re-colonisation of land once the glaciers have gone, so ice was an important
part of the story.
All the glaciers in Glacier Bay have now grounded out, and the area has lost much of its
splendour and excitement. The icy spectacle has gone - no more icebergs. Wildlife and
forest have taken over, a different sort of spectacle.
As the massive sheet of ice that covered what later became Alaska's 'Glacier Bay' retreated,
some 16 tidal glaciers defined the geography of the place and became the subject of intense
geological and biological study. On land, in the course of their retreat, the glaciers would
sometimes fracture, leaving behind huge blocks of ice to slowly melt. Depending on their
size, shape and orientation, these remnants would often produce ice caves as the surface
melted at differential rates. Here is an ice cave that once existed in Tarr Inlet, the western
arm of the Bay: an exterior shot that looks like rock, the outer top of a cavernous hole
inside. Parks personnel told us afterwards that it was extremely dangerous to venture into
unstable ice caves, as they could collapse without warning at any time. This remnant cave
actually did disintegrate about two weeks after we'd been filming in it. Our film was about
the re-colonisation of land once the glaciers have gone, so ice was an important part of the
story.
All the glaciers in Glacier Bay have now grounded out, and the area has lost much of its
splendour and excitement. The icy spectacle has gone - no more icebergs. Wildlife and forest
have taken over, a different sort of spectacle.
As the massive sheet of ice that covered
what later became Alaska's 'Glacier Bay'
retreated, some 16 tidal glaciers defined
the geography of the place and became
the subject of intense geological and
biological study. On land, in the course of
their retreat, the glaciers would
sometimes fracture, leaving behind huge
blocks of ice to slowly melt. Depending on
their size, shape and orientation, these
remnants would often produce ice caves as the surface melted at differential rates.
Here is an ice cave that once existed in Tarr Inlet, the western arm of the Bay: an
exterior shot that looks like rock, the outer top of a cavernous hole inside. Parks
personnel told us afterwards that it was extremely dangerous to venture into unstable
ice caves, as they could collapse without warning at any time. This remnant cave
actually did disintegrate about two weeks after we'd been filming in it. Our film was
about the re-colonisation of land once the glaciers have gone, so ice was an important
part of the story.
All the glaciers in Glacier Bay have now grounded out, and the area has lost much of its
splendour and excitement. The icy spectacle has gone - no more icebergs. Wildlife and
forest have taken over, a different sort of spectacle.

Ice cave

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For your own fine-art print of this picture:
As the massive sheet of ice that covered what later became Alaska's 'Glacier Bay' retreated, some 16 tidal glaciers defined the geography of the place and became the subject of intense geological and biological study.  On land, in the course of their retreat, the glaciers would sometimes fracture, leaving behind huge blocks of ice to slowly melt.  Depending on their size, shape and orientation, these remnants would often produce ice caves as the surface melted at differential rates.   Here is an ice cave that once existed in Tarr Inlet, the western arm of the Bay: an exterior shot that looks like rock, the outer top of a cavernous hole inside.  Parks personnel told us afterwards that it was extremely dangerous to venture into unstable ice caves, as they could collapse without warning at any time.  This remnant cave actually did disintegrate about two weeks after we'd been filming in it. Our film was about the re-colonisation of land once the glaciers have gone, so ice was an important part of the story.

All the glaciers in Glacier Bay have now grounded out, and the area has lost much of its splendour and excitement. The icy spectacle has gone - no more icebergs. Wildlife and forest have taken over, a different sort of spectacle.
A simple composition float-mounted in a smart black frame.

A simple composition float-mounted in a smart black frame.

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