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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Not one of the country's most striking (dare I
say illuminating?) lighthouses, Hurst Castle
(or Hurst Point) lighthouse is safely sited on a
narrow spit of land overlooking the western
entrance to the Solent. It would help
illuminate the Needles – the pointy bits that
end the western edge of the Isle of Wight - on
a dark night, but most shipping now entering
the Solent / Spithead channel does so through
the other end of the Isle of Wight, past the
Napoleonic forts of Spithead into Portsmouth
or Southampton harbours. This picture is not
infra-red shot, although it looks like one. The
light was perfect and the rocks placed just so
to lead the eye into the frame, and a strong
yellow filter darkened the upper sky. A small
amount of parallax correction stopped the
lighthouse appearing to fall backward (they’re
normally slightly tapered anyway) and the
time and place came together for once to
produce the sort of image that you can’t get
with a mobile phone. Yet.
Not one of the country's most striking (dare I say illuminating?) lighthouses, Hurst Castle
(or Hurst Point) lighthouse is safely sited on a narrow spit of land overlooking the
western entrance to the Solent. It would help illuminate the Needles – the pointy bits
that end the western edge of the Isle of Wight - on a dark night, but most shipping now
entering the Solent / Spithead channel does so through the other end of the Isle of Wight,
past the Napoleonic forts of Spithead into Portsmouth or Southampton harbours. This
picture is not infra-red shot, although it looks like one. The light was perfect and the
rocks placed just so to lead the eye into the frame, and a strong yellow filter darkened
the upper sky. A small amount of parallax correction stopped the lighthouse appearing
to fall backward (they’re normally slightly tapered anyway) and the time and place came
together for once to produce the sort of image that you can’t get with a mobile phone.
Yet.
Not one of the country's most striking (dare I
say illuminating?) lighthouses, Hurst Castle
(or Hurst Point) lighthouse is safely sited on a
narrow spit of land overlooking the western
entrance to the Solent. It would help
illuminate the Needles – the pointy bits that
end the western edge of the Isle of Wight - on
a dark night, but most shipping now entering
the Solent / Spithead channel does so through
the other end of the Isle of Wight, past the
Napoleonic forts of Spithead into Portsmouth
or Southampton harbours. This picture is not
infra-red shot, although it looks like one. The
light was perfect and the rocks placed just so
to lead the eye into the frame, and a strong
yellow filter darkened the upper sky. A small
amount of parallax correction stopped the
lighthouse appearing to fall backward (they’re
normally slightly tapered anyway) and the
time and place came together for once to
produce the sort of image that you can’t get
with a mobile phone. Yet.

Hurst Point lighthouse

Not one of the country's most striking (dare I say illuminating?) lighthouses, Hurst Castle (or Hurst Point) lighthouse is safely sited on a narrow spit of land overlooking the western entrance to the Solent. It would help illuminate the Needles - the pointy bits that end the western edge of the Isle of Wight - on a dark night, but most shipping now entering the Solent / Spithead channel does so through the other end of the Isle of Wight, past the Napoleonic forts of Spithead into Portsmouth or Southampton harbours. This picture is not infra-red shot, although it looks like one.  The light was perfect and the rocks placed just so to lead the eye into the frame, and a strong yellow filter darkened the upper sky.  A small amount of parallax correction stopped the lighthouse appearing to fall backward (they’re normally slightly tapered anyway) and the time and place came together for once to produce the sort of image that you can’t get with a mobile phone.  Yet.  
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