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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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These exquisite horse heads are from the
Royal Necropolis of Sidon archaeological
site (in present-day Lebanon) and are on
the marble tomb known as the Lycian
Sarcophagus. It dates from the 5th
century BC and can be seen in the Istanbul
Museum of Antiquities. Like a lot of
Istanbul on my last visit, half the Museum
was closed for restoration. The Hagia
Sophia, the largest building in Turkey, built
in the 6th century AD as a Christian (Greek Orthodox) Cathedral, becoming an Ottoman
mosque in the 15th century (and a museum since 1930) - was undergoing restoration
too, with most of the interior covered in scaffolding. They didn't reduce the entrace fee,
though. The Naval Museum was closed completely, we discovered when we got there. It
didn't really matter, since Istanbul has enough treasures for a lifetime as it is, but a bit
galling when we only had three days before moving on. These beautiful prancing
horse-heads reminded me of the bronze horses of St Mark's Basilica in Venice, which I've
never been able to photograph.
These exquisite horse heads are from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon archaeological site
(in present-day Lebanon) and are on the marble tomb known as the Lycian Sarcophagus.
It dates from the 5th century BC and can be seen in the Istanbul Museum of Antiquities.
Like a lot of Istanbul on my last visit, half the Museum was closed for restoration. The
Hagia Sophia, the largest building in Turkey, built in the 6th century AD as a Christian
(Greek Orthodox) Cathedral, becoming an Ottoman mosque in the 15th century (and a
museum since 1930) - was undergoing restoration too, with most of the interior covered
in scaffolding. They didn't reduce the entrace fee, though. The Naval Museum was closed
completely, we discovered when we got there. It didn't really matter, since Istanbul has
enough treasures for a lifetime as it is, but a bit galling when we only had three days
before moving on. These beautiful prancing horse-heads reminded me of the bronze
horses of St Mark's Basilica in Venice, which I've never been able to photograph.
These exquisite horse heads are from the
Royal Necropolis of Sidon archaeological
site (in present-day Lebanon) and are on
the marble tomb known as the Lycian
Sarcophagus. It dates from the 5th
century BC and can be seen in the Istanbul
Museum of Antiquities. Like a lot of
Istanbul on my last visit, half the Museum
was closed for restoration. The Hagia
Sophia, the largest building in Turkey, built
in the 6th century AD as a Christian (Greek Orthodox) Cathedral, becoming an Ottoman
mosque in the 15th century (and a museum since 1930) - was undergoing restoration
too, with most of the interior covered in scaffolding. They didn't reduce the entrace fee,
though. The Naval Museum was closed completely, we discovered when we got there. It
didn't really matter, since Istanbul has enough treasures for a lifetime as it is, but a bit
galling when we only had three days before moving on. These beautiful prancing
horse-heads reminded me of the bronze horses of St Mark's Basilica in Venice, which I've
never been able to photograph.

Sarcophagus sculpture

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For your own fine-art print of this picture:
These exquisite horse heads are from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon archaeological site (in present-day Lebanon) and are on the marble tomb known as the Lycian Sarcophagus.  It dates from the 5th century BC and can be seen in the Istanbul Museum of Antiquities. Like a lot of Istanbul on my last visit, half the Museum was closed for restoration. The Hagia Sophia, the largest building in Turkey, built in the 6th century AD as a Christian (Greek Orthodox) Cathedral, becoming an Ottoman mosque in the 15th century (and a museum since 1930) - was undergoing restoration too, with most of the interior covered in scaffolding. They didn't reduce the entrace fee, though.  The Naval Museum was closed completely, we discovered when we got there. It didn't really matter, since Istanbul has enough treasures for a lifetime as it is, but a bit galling when we only had three days before moving on. These beautiful prancing horse-heads reminded me of the bronze horses of St Mark's Basilica in Venice, which I've never been able to photograph.    
A rare case where a coloured mount suits the picture better than a white or ivory one.

A rare case where a coloured mount suits the picture better than a white or ivory one.

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