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I'm allergic to horses, or rather to the hay
in their stables, to which I get an immediate
and severe reaction. Or I used to, but
some years ago I was contracted by an
American producer to shoot the pilot of a
series of programmes about horses, to be
shot worldwide if the pilot was successful.
This first film was based on the National
Horse Fair at Golega in Portugal, to which
Lusitano horses and their riders from all
over Europe would attend. For four days it
rained practically non-stop, which landed
me with some technical problems,
especially at night, but the footage I got
was, if anything, enhanced by the
atmosphere, with everyone at the Fair pulling together to make the best of it.
Unfortunately, the series did not come off, as neither I nor the producers saw the
finished episode - the director, a strange fellow by turns affable and violently un-affable,
scarpered one night from the edit suite with all the rushes and was never seen again.
The producers later told me that it had looked like 'a million bucks had been spent on the
material', so I was particularly miffed at never having seen any of it. Anyway, I had had
no reaction at all to the stables at Golega for some reason, which was just as well or it
would have made my work impossible.
These two beauties were being paraded at a country fair in Surrey, although I have
changed an unappealing background for one more to my liking.
I'm allergic to horses, or rather to the hay in their stables, to which I get an immediate
and severe reaction. Or I used to, but some years ago I was contracted by an American
producer to shoot the pilot of a series of programmes about horses, to be shot
worldwide if the pilot was successful. This first film was based on the National Horse Fair
at Golega in Portugal, to which Lusitano horses and their riders from all over Europe
would attend. For four days it rained practically non-stop, which landed me with some
technical problems, especially at night, but the footage I got was, if anything, enhanced
by the atmosphere, with everyone at the Fair pulling together to make the best of it.
Unfortunately, the series did not come off, as neither I nor the producers saw the
finished episode - the director, a strange fellow by turns affable and violently un-affable,
scarpered one night from the edit suite with all the rushes and was never seen again.
The producers later told me that it had looked like 'a million bucks had been spent on the
material', so I was particularly miffed at never having seen any of it. Anyway, I had had
no reaction at all to the stables at Golega for some reason, which was just as well or it
would have made my work impossible.
These two beauties were being paraded at a country fair in Surrey, although I have
changed an unappealing background for one more to my liking.
I'm allergic to horses, or rather to the hay in
their stables, to which I get an immediate and
severe reaction. Or I used to, but some years
ago I was contracted by an American
producer to shoot the pilot of a series of
programmes about horses, to be shot
worldwide if the pilot was successful. This first
film was based on the National Horse Fair at
Golega in Portugal, to which Lusitano horses
and their riders from all over Europe would
attend. For four days it rained practically
non-stop, which landed me with some
technical problems, especially at night, but
the footage I got was, if anything, enhanced
by the atmosphere, with everyone at the Fair
pulling together to make the best of it. Unfortunately, the series did not come off, as
neither I nor the producers saw the finished episode - the director, a strange fellow by
turns affable and violently un-affable, scarpered one night from the edit suite with all the
rushes and was never seen again. The producers later told me that it had looked like 'a
million bucks had been spent on the material', so I was particularly miffed at never having
seen any of it. Anyway, I had had no reaction at all to the stables at Golega for some
reason, which was just as well or it would have made my work impossible.
These two beauties were being paraded at a country fair in Surrey, although I have
changed an unappealing background for one more to my liking.

Equine parade

I'm allergic to horses, or rather to the hay in their stables, to which I get an immediate and severe reaction.  Or I used to, but some years ago I was contracted by an American producer to shoot the pilot of a series of programmes about horses, to be shot worldwide if the pilot was successful. This first film was based on the National Horse Fair at Golega in Portugal, to which Lusitano horses and their riders from all over Europe would attend. For four days it rained practically non-stop, which landed me with some technical problems, especially at night, but the footage I got was, if anything, enhanced by the atmosphere, with everyone at the Fair pulling together to make the best of it.  Unfortunately, the series did not come off, as neither I nor the producers saw the finished episode - the director, a strange fellow by turns affable and violently un-affable, scarpered one night from the edit suite with all the rushes and was never seen again.  The producers later told me that it had looked like 'a million bucks had been spent on the material', so I was particularly miffed at never having seen any of it.  Anyway, I had had no reaction at all to the stables at Golega for some reason, which was just as well or it would have made my work impossible.
   These two beauties were being paraded at a country fair in Surrey, although I have changed an unappealing background for one more to my liking.
For your own fine-art print of this picture:
For this 'traditional' picture I've used a 'traditional' oak frame

For this 'traditional' picture I've used a 'traditional' oak frame

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