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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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The artist and sculptor Maggie Hambling's
iconic piece 'Scallop' was installed on the
beach in Aldebugh in 2003, causing
considerable controversy at the time (and
since). It's claimed it 'spoils' the beach, or
is a health and safety liability (it's built to
withstand 100mph winds), or is just plain
ugly. As it's situated well away from the
main part of Aldeburgh, on an otherwise
mostly deserted beach, and
commemorates a line from Benjamin Britten's opera 'Peter Grimes', a tragedy at sea off
the Suffolk coast, it seems to me to be entirely appropriate, and one of a number of
attractions bringing people into this otherwise fairly remote Suffolk town. Nothing is
ever to everyone's taste, but some people make an awful lot of fuss when presented with
something 'new'. 'Scallop', thankfully, is still there, and I think a lot of people would miss
it if it were taken away: it's a local landmark whether you like it or not. The inscription
reads "I hear those voices that will not be drowned", and 'Peter Grimes' is itself regularly
performed by opera groups on this very beach.
My own style, if it can be said I have one, is to try to photograph things 'differently',
and I think I've achieved that with this close up of part of the cut-out inscription.
The artist and sculptor Maggie Hambling's iconic piece 'Scallop' was installed on the
beach in Aldebugh in 2003, causing considerable controversy at the time (and since). It's
claimed it 'spoils' the beach, or is a health and safety liability (it's built to withstand
100mph winds), or is just plain ugly. As it's situated well away from the main part of
Aldeburgh, on an otherwise mostly deserted beach, and commemorates a line from
Benjamin Britten's opera 'Peter Grimes', a tragedy at sea off the Suffolk coast, it seems
to me to be entirely appropriate, and one of a number of attractions bringing people
into this otherwise fairly remote Suffolk town. Nothing is ever to everyone's taste, but
some people make an awful lot of fuss when presented with something 'new'. 'Scallop',
thankfully, is still there, and I think a lot of people would miss it if it were taken away: it's
a local landmark whether you like it or not. The inscription reads "I hear those voices
that will not be drowned", and 'Peter Grimes' is itself regularly performed by opera
groups on this very beach.
My own style, if it can be said I have one, is to try to photograph things 'differently',
and I think I've achieved that with this close up of part of the cut-out inscription.
The artist and sculptor Maggie Hambling's
iconic piece 'Scallop' was installed on the
beach in Aldebugh in 2003, causing
considerable controversy at the time (and
since). It's claimed it 'spoils' the beach, or
is a health and safety liability (it's built to
withstand 100mph winds), or is just plain
ugly. As it's situated well away from the
main part of Aldeburgh, on an otherwise
mostly deserted beach, and
commemorates a line from Benjamin Britten's opera 'Peter Grimes', a tragedy at sea off
the Suffolk coast, it seems to me to be entirely appropriate, and one of a number of
attractions bringing people into this otherwise fairly remote Suffolk town. Nothing is
ever to everyone's taste, but some people make an awful lot of fuss when presented with
something 'new'. 'Scallop', thankfully, is still there, and I think a lot of people would miss
it if it were taken away: it's a local landmark whether you like it or not. The inscription
reads "I hear those voices that will not be drowned", and 'Peter Grimes' is itself regularly
performed by opera groups on this very beach.
My own style, if it can be said I have one, is to try to photograph things 'differently',
and I think I've achieved that with this close up of part of the cut-out inscription.

Scallop, Aldeburgh

For your own fine-art print of this picture:
The artist and sculptor Maggie Hambling's iconic piece 'Scallop' was installed on the beach in Aldebugh in 2003, causing considerable controversy at the time (and since).  It's claimed it 'spoils' the beach, or is a health and safety liability (it's built to withstand 100mph winds), or is just plain ugly.  As it's situated well away from the main part of Aldeburgh, on an otherwise mostly deserted beach, and commemorates a line from Benjamin Britten's opera 'Peter Grimes', a tragedy at sea off the Suffolk coast, it seems to me to be entirely appropriate, and one of a number of attractions bringing people into this otherwise fairly remote Suffolk town. Nothing is ever to everyone's taste, but some people make an awful lot of fuss when presented with something 'new'. 'Scallop', thankfully, is still there, and I think a lot of people would miss it if it were taken away: it's a local landmark whether you like it or not. The inscription reads "I hear those voices that will not be drowned", and 'Peter Grimes' is itself regularly performed by opera groups on this very beach.    
    My own style, if it can be said I have one, is to try to photograph things 'differently', and I think I've achieved that with this close up of part of the cut-out inscription.
Grey mount and a polished wood frame give this image a distinctive look

Grey mount and a polished wood frame give this image a distinctive look

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Suffolk

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Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence