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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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This curious sight has now been visible for at
least ten years behind a row of shops on
London's South Bank. It appears to be a small
dinghy cut in half and then abandoned on
what looks like a small stage set. Being so
close to the Tate Modern perhaps it's a piece
of installation art, but if it is nobody's bought
it or even owned up to it. Perhaps it is a small
stage prop, for a nightly performance of...
what? Moby Dick? Billy Budd?, a very
low-budget one-man Titanic? (There are no
stage lights, so it's probably not that.) No,
probably just an eccentric Englishman's idea
of a joke.
I'll never know now, but one would have thought that the value of the real estate it's
sitting on would have seen this half-boat removed years ago and the corner plot now
sporting an outlet for more tourist dross of the sort that disfigures much else in this area
(though I'd be the last to deny any visitor to London his or her share of the delights of
the South Bank, including the Globe Theatre, the Festival Hall complex, the Tate, the old
Clink jail, and much more). Where this was once the site of the 'Stews of London' it's now
its most entertaining and agreeable playground.
This curious sight has now been visible for at least ten years behind a row of shops on
London's South Bank. It appears to be a small dinghy cut in half and then abandoned on
what looks like a small stage set. Being so close to the Tate Modern perhaps it's a piece
of installation art, but if it is nobody's bought it or even owned up to it. Perhaps it is a
small stage prop, for a nightly performance of... what? Moby Dick? Billy Budd?, a very
low-budget one-man Titanic? (There are no stage lights, so it's probably not that.) No,
probably just an eccentric Englishman's idea of a joke.
I'll never know now, but one would have thought that the value of the real estate it's
sitting on would have seen this half-boat removed years ago and the corner plot now
sporting an outlet for more tourist dross of the sort that disfigures much else in this area
(though I'd be the last to deny any visitor to London his or her share of the delights of
the South Bank, including the Globe Theatre, the Festival Hall complex, the Tate, the old
Clink jail, and much more). Where this was once the site of the 'Stews of London' it's now
its most entertaining and agreeable playground.
This curious sight has now been visible for at
least ten years behind a row of shops on
London's South Bank. It appears to be a small
dinghy cut in half and then abandoned on
what looks like a small stage set. Being so
close to the Tate Modern perhaps it's a piece
of installation art, but if it is nobody's bought
it or even owned up to it. Perhaps it is a small
stage prop, for a nightly performance of...
what? Moby Dick? Billy Budd?, a very
low-budget one-man Titanic? (There are no
stage lights, so it's probably not that.) No,
probably just an eccentric Englishman's idea
of a joke.
I'll never know now, but one would have thought that the value of the real estate it's
sitting on would have seen this half-boat removed years ago and the corner plot now
sporting an outlet for more tourist dross of the sort that disfigures much else in this area
(though I'd be the last to deny any visitor to London his or her share of the delights of
the South Bank, including the Globe Theatre, the Festival Hall complex, the Tate, the old
Clink jail, and much more). Where this was once the site of the 'Stews of London' it's now
its most entertaining and agreeable playground.

Half a boat

This curious sight has now been visible for at least ten years behind a row of shops on London's South Bank. It appears to be a small dinghy cut in half and then abandoned on what looks like a small stage set.  Being so close to the Tate Modern perhaps it's a piece of installation art, but if it is nobody's bought it or even owned up to it. Perhaps it is a small stage prop, for a nightly performance of... what? Moby Dick? Billy Budd?, a very low-budget one-man Titanic? (There are no stage lights, so it's probably not that.) No, probably just an eccentric Englishman's idea of a joke. 

I'll never know now, but one would have thought that the value of the real estate it's sitting on would have seen this half-boat removed years ago and the corner plot now sporting an outlet for more tourist dross of the sort that disfigures much else in this area (though I'd be the last to deny any visitor to London his or her share of the delights of the South Bank, including the Globe Theatre, the Festival Hall complex, the Tate, the old Clink jail, and much more). Where this was once the site of the 'Stews of London' it's now its most entertaining and agreeable playground.
A grey frame, not black, can work well when there are many mid-tones in the picture

A grey frame, not black, can work well when there are many mid-tones in the picture

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