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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Gold Hill, in Dorset's Shaftesbury, must be
one of the country's most-photographed
spots after the highlights of London. This very
steep cobbled hill, lined with old cottages,
leads from the centre of Shaftesbury to
outlying villages on the roads to Dorchester
or Blandford Forum. Mention Gold Hill to
people of a certain age and they will fondly
remember the Hovis bread ad that was
filmed here, set to a brass-band version of
the slow movement from Dvořák's New World Symphony. Because my best friend, Al,
from Salisbury Art College, came from Shaftesbury (and who now lives on the side of
another hill, in Tuscany), I was a semi-frequent visitor to his home town. On one occasion,
we'd tried to get my old British motorbike up the hill from the bottom end, and signally
failed to get more than a few yards up. How the folks who live here don't expire from
exhaustion, I don't know. Perhaps they do, as there never seemed to be many people on
the hill when I was there.
This picture was from cobble level and was taken in broad daylight, more as a memo than
anything else, but tweaking it to give it a sunset look has made it into a more attractive
picture.
Gold Hill, in Dorset's Shaftesbury, must be one of the country's most-photographed spots
after the highlights of London. This very steep cobbled hill, lined with old cottages, leads
from the centre of Shaftesbury to outlying villages on the roads to Dorchester or
Blandford Forum. Mention Gold Hill to people of a certain age and they will fondly
remember the Hovis bread ad that was filmed here, set to a brass-band version of the
slow movement from Dvořák's New World Symphony. Because my best friend, Al, from
Salisbury Art College, came from Shaftesbury (and who now lives on the side of another
hill, in Tuscany), I was a semi-frequent visitor to his home town. On one occasion, we'd
tried to get my old British motorbike up the hill from the bottom end, and signally failed
to get more than a few yards up. How the folks who live here don't expire from
exhaustion, I don't know. Perhaps they do, as there never seemed to be many people on
the hill when I was there.
This picture was from cobble level and was taken in broad daylight, more as a memo
than anything else, but tweaking it to give it a sunset look has made it into a more
attractive picture.
Gold Hill, in Dorset's Shaftesbury, must be
one of the country's most-photographed
spots after the highlights of London. This
very steep cobbled hill, lined with old
cottages, leads from the centre of
Shaftesbury to outlying villages on the roads
to Dorchester or Blandford Forum. Mention
Gold Hill to people of a certain age and they
will fondly remember the Hovis bread ad
that was filmed here, set to a brass-band
version of the slow movement from Dvořák's New World Symphony. Because my best
friend, Al, from Salisbury Art College, came from Shaftesbury (and who now lives on the
side of another hill, in Tuscany), I was a semi-frequent visitor to his home town. On one
occasion, we'd tried to get my old British motorbike up the hill from the bottom end, and
signally failed to get more than a few yards up. How the folks who live here don't expire
from exhaustion, I don't know. Perhaps they do, as there never seemed to be many people
on the hill when I was there.
This picture was from cobble level and was taken in broad daylight, more as a memo than
anything else, but tweaking it to give it a sunset look has made it into a more attractive
picture.

Gold Hill

Gold Hill, in Dorset's Shaftesbury, must be one of the country's most-photographed spots after the highlights of London. This very steep cobbled hill, lined with old cottages, leads from the centre of Shaftesbury to outlying villages on the roads to Dorchester or Blandford Forum.  Mention Gold Hill to people of a certain age and they will fondly remember the Hovis bread ad that was filmed here, set to a brass-band version of the slow movement from Dvořák's New World Symphony.  Because my best friend, Al, from Salisbury Art College, came from Shaftesbury (and who now lives on the side of another hill, in Tuscany), I was a semi-frequent visitor to his home town.  On one occasion, we'd tried to get my old British motorbike up the hill from the bottom end, and signally failed to get more than a few yards up. How the folks who live here don't expire from exhaustion, I don't know. Perhaps they do, as there never seemed to be many people on the hill when I was there.
This picture was from cobble level and was taken in broad daylight, more as a memo than anything else, but tweaking it to give it a sunset look has made it into a more attractive picture.  
A smaller print in a larger frame can be very effective

A smaller print in a larger frame can be very effective

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