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Sunk, with the loss of all spiders. My next-door
neighbour's boat was found abandoned and
under three feet of water in the River Gipping
in Mid-Suffolk. It doesn't get used much now,
as the river is in the process of becoming
completely clogged by reeds since the local
council (or somebody) ripped out a number of
beautiful willows on the opposite bank that
were sheltering the benthic fauna, along with
the rest of the riverbank flora. This action was
apparently to alleviate the flood problem that occurred most winters, and caused the
flatlands of the adjacent farm to become temporary water parks. It seems to have
worked - the river level is now usually low for most of the year, but the corollary is that
the reeds, now exposed to the full glare of sunlight, are strangling the river from both
banks. The neighbours and I try to keep it clear from our side, leaving the ducks and
swans (and apparenrtly an otter, although we've never seen her) to forage from the
opposite bank, but it's a time-consuming and never-ending process. And yet, it still
doesn't make for a river you can use a boat on.
Sunk, with the loss of all spiders. My next-door neighbour's boat was found abandoned
and under three feet of water in the River Gipping in Mid-Suffolk. It doesn't get used
much now, as the river is in the process of becoming completely clogged by reeds since
the local council (or somebody) ripped out a number of beautiful willows on the opposite
bank that were sheltering the benthic fauna, along with the rest of the riverbank flora.
This action was apparently to alleviate the flood problem that occurred most winters,
and caused the flatlands of the adjacent farm to become temporary water parks. It
seems to have worked - the river level is now usually low for most of the year, but the
corollary is that the reeds, now exposed to the full glare of sunlight, are strangling the
river from both banks. The neighbours and I try to keep it clear from our side, leaving the
ducks and swans (and apparenrtly an otter, although we've never seen her) to forage
from the opposite bank, but it's a time-consuming and never-ending process. And yet, it
still doesn't make for a river you can use a boat on.
Sunk, with the loss of all spiders. My
next-door neighbour's boat was found
abandoned and under three feet of water in
the River Gipping in Mid-Suffolk. It doesn't get
used much now, as the river is in the process
of becoming completely clogged by reeds
since the local council (or somebody) ripped
out a number of beautiful willows on the
opposite bank that were sheltering the
benthic fauna, along with the rest of the
riverbank flora. This action was apparently to alleviate the flood problem that occurred
most winters, and caused the flatlands of the adjacent farm to become temporary
water parks. It seems to have worked - the river level is now usually low for most of the
year, but the corollary is that the reeds, now exposed to the full glare of sunlight, are
strangling the river from both banks. The neighbours and I try to keep it clear from our
side, leaving the ducks and swans (and apparenrtly an otter, although we've never seen
her) to forage from the opposite bank, but it's a time-consuming and never-ending
process. And yet, it still doesn't make for a river you can use a boat on.

Next door's Titanic

For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Sunk, with the loss of all spiders. My next-door neighbour's boat was found abandoned and under three feet of water in the River Gipping in Mid-Suffolk. It doesn't get used much now, as the river is in the process of becoming completely clogged by reeds since the local council (or somebody) ripped out a number of beautiful willows on the opposite bank that were sheltering the benthic fauna, along with the rest of the riverbank flora. This action was apparently to alleviate the flood problem that occurred most winters, and caused the flatlands of the adjacent farm to become temporary water parks. It seems to have worked - the river level is now usually low for most of the year, but the corollary is that the reeds, now exposed to the full glare of sunlight, are strangling the river from both banks. The neighbours and I try to keep it clear from our side, leaving the ducks and swans (and apparenrtly an otter, although we've never seen her) to forage from the opposite bank, but it's a time-consuming and never-ending process. And yet, it still doesn't make for a river you can use a boat on.  
Sometimes a white frame works well, as here, where it matches the boat.

Sometimes a white frame works well, as here, where it matches the boat.

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Suffolk
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence