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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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Or more correctly 'full to the gunwales',
although 'gunwales' is pronounced (and
often spelt) gunnels. Coming from a naval
part of the world where 'gunwales' was
not such a rare word as it is today, the
expression (for being full 't brim) was
common currency in the local dialect.
Traditionally, the gunwales were the
upper planking of a ship's side, as seen in
this photograph of a waterlogged boat at
Felixstowe Ferry, Suffolk.
Or more correctly 'full to the gunwales', although 'gunwales' is pronounced (and often
spelt) gunnels. Coming from a naval part of the world where 'gunwales' was not such a
rare word as it is today, the expression (for being full 't brim) was common currency in
the local dialect. Traditionally, the gunwales were the upper planking of a ship's side, as
seen in this photograph of a waterlogged boat at Felixstowe Ferry, Suffolk.
Or more correctly 'full to the gunwales',
although 'gunwales' is pronounced (and
often spelt) gunnels. Coming from a naval
part of the world where 'gunwales' was
not such a rare word as it is today, the
expression (for being full 't brim) was
common currency in the local dialect.
Traditionally, the gunwales were the
upper planking of a ship's side, as seen in
this photograph of a waterlogged boat at
Felixstowe Ferry, Suffolk.

Up to the gun'ls


For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Or more correctly 'full to the gunwales', although 'gunwales' is pronounced (and often spelt) gunnels. Coming from a naval part of the world where 'gunwales' was not such a rare word as it is today, the expression (for being full 't brim) was common currency in the local dialect. Traditionally, the gunwales were the upper planking of a ship's side, as seen in this photograph of a waterlogged boat at Felixstowe Ferry, Suffolk.
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Suffolk
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence