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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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You don't see these ships- or boats-
figureheads so often now as you used to,
and I don't recall seeing any in a marina
anywhere for many a year. But in
maritime or naval museums throughout
the UK they abound, either as preserved
examples or in miniature on ships models
or in design drawings. Their variety is
astounding, but its always as some form
of carved charm that is to bring luck or
fortune to the seafarers in their respective vessels, or a means of preserving the
prestigious name of the vessel. Highly decorative and often gaudily - even grotesquely -
coloured, and often with gold incorporated somewhere, as here, they would preserve
the ship's identity and aid its recognition. Many a seaman has only found his own ship
after a few hours ashore by the the sight of his looming Neptune or Ariadne hanging off
the bowsprit. He may not be sober, but at least he's 'home'. Most Napoleonic-era
'wooden-wall' battleships, of both Britain and France (and many other nations) would
have had beautifully sculpted figureheads, often being preserved from ship to ship as
they were rebuilt with later designs. But come the era of the ironclad and the
Dreadnoughts of WW1, there was no place for them and their colourful history was at
an end, to be replaced by ships' badges mounted on the superstructure.
You don't see these ships- or boats- figureheads so often now as you used to, and I
don't recall seeing any in a marina anywhere for many a year. But in maritime or
naval museums throughout the UK they abound, either as preserved examples or in
miniature on ships models or in design drawings. Their variety is astounding, but its
always as some form of carved charm that is to bring luck or fortune to the seafarers
in their respective vessels, or a means of preserving the prestigious name of the
vessel. Highly decorative and often gaudily - even grotesquely - coloured, and often
with gold incorporated somewhere, as here, they would preserve the ship's identity
and aid its recognition. Many a seaman has only found his own ship after a few hours
ashore by the the sight of his looming Neptune or Ariadne hanging off the bowsprit.
He may not be sober, but at least he's 'home'. Most Napoleonic-era 'wooden-wall'
battleships, of both Britain and France (and many other nations) would have had
beautifully sculpted figureheads, often being preserved from ship to ship as they were
rebuilt with later designs. But come the era of the ironclad and the Dreadnoughts of
WW1, there was no place for them and their colourful history was at an end, to be
replaced by ships' badges mounted on the superstructure.
You don't see these ships- or boats-
figureheads so often now as you used to, and
I don't recall seeing any in a marina
anywhere for many a year. But in maritime
or naval museums throughout the UK they
abound, either as preserved examples or in
miniature on ships models or in design
drawings. Their variety is astounding, but its
always as some form of carved charm that is
to bring luck or fortune to the seafarers in
their respective vessels, or a means of preserving the prestigious name of the vessel. Highly
decorative and often gaudily - even grotesquely - coloured, and often with gold
incorporated somewhere, as here, they would preserve the ship's identity and aid its
recognition. Many a seaman has only found his own ship after a few hours ashore by the
the sight of his looming Neptune or Ariadne hanging off the bowsprit. He may not be sober,
but at least he's 'home'. Most Napoleonic-era 'wooden-wall' battleships, of both Britain
and France (and many other nations) would have had beautifully sculpted figureheads,
often being preserved from ship to ship as they were rebuilt with later designs. But come
the era of the ironclad and the Dreadnoughts of WW1, there was no place for them and
their colourful history was at an end, to be replaced by ships' badges mounted on the
superstructure.

Figurehead

You don't see these ships- or boats-figureheads so often now as you used to, and I don't recall seeing any in a marina anywhere for many a year. But in maritime or naval museums throughout the UK they abound, either as preserved examples or in miniature on ships models or in design drawings. Their variety is astounding, but its always as some form of carved charm that is to bring luck or fortune to the seafarers in their respective vessels, or a means of preserving the prestigious name of the vessel. Highly decorative and often gaudily - even grotesquely - coloured, and often with gold incorporated somewhere, as here, they would preserve the ship's identity and aid its recognition.  Many a seaman has only found his own ship after a few hours ashore by the the sight of his looming Neptune or Ariadne hanging off the bowsprit. He may not be sober, but at least he's 'home'.  Most Napoleonic-era 'wooden-wall' battleships, of both Britain and France (and many other nations) would have had  beautifully sculpted figureheads, often being preserved from ship to ship as these were rebuilt with later designs. But by the era of the ironclad and the Dreadnoughts of WW1, there was no place for them and their colourful history was at an end, to be replaced by ships' badges mounted on the superstructure.            
For your own fine-art print of this picture:
Classic polished dark-wood round moulding

Classic polished dark-wood round moulding

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