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When I arrived in Beirut - as a one-man crew -
to shoot a corporate video on the
reconstruction of the city after its 17yr civil
war, I was totally unprepared for what I was
to find. We (the director and producer and I)
often had to have an armed escort as there
was still unrest in parts of the city. There were
Syrian army roadblocks everywhere, but no
electricity after 10:00 pm. And just one set of
traffic lights that worked, resulting in traffic
chaos everywhere. On the approximately two days I had off in the following month (apart
from a weekend in Damascus), one I spent in ancient Byblos, further up the coast, with its
crusader castle and not much else, and the other in the grounds of the American
University, reading. I wasn't in the mood for photography, and anyway it wasn't a good
idea to be wandering around - in my usual lurking manner - in a still nervous, suspicious
environment. However, we did manage to squeeze in an evening visit to this Roman
temple at Faqra, in the (I think) Druze hills above the city, and this is one of the few
images that I've kept from that crazy, exhausting, but ultimately rewarding month in
Lebanon. On the way back from Faqra we had the most spectacular lightning display I've
ever seen, over Beirut and out at sea, illuminating all the places I hadn't yet seen in the
eastern Med, and probably never would.
When I arrived in Beirut - as a one-man crew - to shoot a corporate video on the
reconstruction of the city after its 17yr civil war, I was totally unprepared for what I was
to find. We (the director and producer and I) often had to have an armed escort as there
was still unrest in parts of the city. There were Syrian army roadblocks everywhere, but
no electricity after 10:00 pm. And just one set of traffic lights that worked, resulting in
traffic chaos everywhere. On the approximately two days I had off in the following month
(apart from a weekend in Damascus), one I spent in ancient Byblos, further up the coast,
with its crusader castle and not much else, and the other in the grounds of the American
University, reading. I wasn't in the mood for photography, and anyway it wasn't a good
idea to be wandering around - in my usual lurking manner - in a still nervous, suspicious
environment. However, we did manage to squeeze in an evening visit to this Roman
temple at Faqra, in the (I think) Druze hills above the city, and this is one of the few
images that I've kept from that crazy, exhausting, but ultimately rewarding month in
Lebanon. On the way back from Faqra we had the most spectacular lightning display I've
ever seen, over Beirut and out at sea, illuminating all the places I hadn't yet seen in the
eastern Med, and probably never would.
When I arrived in Beirut - as a one-man crew -
to shoot a corporate video on the
reconstruction of the city after its 17yr civil
war, I was totally unprepared for what I was
to find. We (the director and producer and I)
often had to have an armed escort as there
was still unrest in parts of the city. There were
Syrian army roadblocks everywhere, but no
electricity after 10:00 pm. And just one set of
traffic lights that worked, resulting in traffic
chaos everywhere. On the approximately two days I had off in the following month (apart
from a weekend in Damascus), one I spent in ancient Byblos, further up the coast, with its
crusader castle and not much else, and the other in the grounds of the American
University, reading. I wasn't in the mood for photography, and anyway it wasn't a good
idea to be wandering around - in my usual lurking manner - in a still nervous, suspicious
environment. However, we did manage to squeeze in an evening visit to this Roman
temple at Faqra, in the (I think) Druze hills above the city, and this is one of the few
images that I've kept from that crazy, exhausting, but ultimately rewarding month in
Lebanon. On the way back from Faqra we had the most spectacular lightning display I've
ever seen, over Beirut and out at sea, illuminating all the places I hadn't yet seen in the
eastern Med, and probably never would.

Roman Faqra

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For your own fine-art print of this picture:
When I arrived in Beirut - as a one-man crew - to shoot a corporate video on the reconstruction of the city after its 17yr civil war, I was totally unprepared for what I was to find. We (the director and producer and I) often had to have an armed escort as there was still unrest in parts of the city. There were Syrian army roadblocks everywhere, but no electricity after 10:00 pm. And just one set of traffic lights that worked, resulting in traffic chaos everywhere. On the approximately two days I had off in the following month (apart from a weekend in Damascus), one I spent in ancient Byblos, further up the coast, with its crusader castle and not much else, and the other in the grounds of the American University, reading. I wasn't in the mood for photography, and anyway it wasn't a good idea to be wandering around - in my usual lurking manner - in a still nervous, suspicious environment. However, we did manage to squeeze in an evening visit to this Roman temple at Faqra, in the (I think) Druze hills above the city, and this is one of the few images that I've kept from that crazy, exhausting, but ultimately rewarding month in Lebanon. On the way back from Faqra we had the most spectacular lightning display I've ever seen, over Beirut and out at sea, illuminating all the places I hadn't yet seen in the eastern Med, and probably never would.
Here the picture has an extra black line surround and a plain mount and frame.

Here the picture has an extra black line surround and a plain mount and frame.

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