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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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One of the most astonishing sights I've seen
(and failed to photograph - I had no camera
with me on the day) was an entire hillside in
the Himalayas filled with magnolias in bloom.
In London we were once given a small
cutting from a friend's magnolia tree, which
flourished beautifully in our east-facing
garden. When we moved, just a few streets
away, we missed our gorgeous magnolia, but
planted an Indian bean tree (Catalpa) in our
small west-facing patio garden. It eventually became a beautiful tree with large thick
leaves that provided summer shade almost over the entire patio. It was joined in our
later years in London by 'Brian', a silver birch so called because its wooden support
structure, before it could stand unaided, reminded us of the ultimate scene from Monty
Python's 'Life of Brian.' Now in Suffolk we have a beautiful silver birch and an embryo
catalpa (from a cutting), but sadly no magnolia as yet. This one, spotted in Eye growing
out of a crack in the concrete, was a nice reminder of our 'lost' tree.
One of the most astonishing sights I've seen (and failed to photograph - I had no camera
with me on the day) was an entire hillside in the Himalayas filled with magnolias in
bloom. In London we were once given a small cutting from a friend's magnolia tree,
which flourished beautifully in our east-facing garden. When we moved, just a few streets
away, we missed our gorgeous magnolia, but planted an Indian bean tree (Catalpa) in
our small west-facing patio garden. It eventually became a beautiful tree with large thick
leaves that provided summer shade almost over the entire patio. It was joined in our
later years in London by 'Brian', a silver birch so called because its wooden support
structure, before it could stand unaided, reminded us of the ultimate scene from Monty
Python's 'Life of Brian.' Now in Suffolk we have a beautiful silver birch and an embryo
catalpa (from a cutting), but sadly no magnolia as yet. This one, spotted in Eye growing
out of a crack in the concrete, was a nice reminder of our 'lost' tree.
One of the most astonishing sights I've seen
(and failed to photograph - I had no camera
with me on the day) was an entire hillside in
the Himalayas filled with magnolias in bloom.
In London we were once given a small cutting
from a friend's magnolia tree, which
flourished beautifully in our east-facing
garden. When we moved, just a few streets
away, we missed our gorgeous magnolia, but
planted an Indian bean tree (Catalpa) in our
small west-facing patio garden. It eventually became a beautiful tree with large thick
leaves that provided summer shade almost over the entire patio. It was joined in our
later years in London by 'Brian', a silver birch so called because its wooden support
structure, before it could stand unaided, reminded us of the ultimate scene from Monty
Python's 'Life of Brian.' Now in Suffolk we have a beautiful silver birch and an embryo
catalpa (from a cutting), but sadly no magnolia as yet. This one, spotted in Eye growing
out of a crack in the concrete, was a nice reminder of our 'lost' tree.

Eye alley


For your own fine-art print of this picture:
One of the most astonishing sights I've seen (and failed to photograph - I had no camera with me on the day) was an entire hillside in the Himalayas filled with magnolias in bloom. In London we were once given a small cutting from a friend's magnolia tree, which flourished beautifully in our east-facing garden. When we moved, just a few streets away, we missed our gorgeous magnolia, but planted an Indian bean tree (Catalpa) in our small west-facing patio garden. It eventually became a beautiful tree with large thick leaves that provided summer shade almost over the entire patio. It was joined in our later years in London by 'Brian', a silver birch so called because its wooden support structure, before it could stand unaided, reminded us of the ultimate scene from Monty Python's 'Life of Brian.'  Now in Suffolk we have a beautiful silver birch and an embryo catalpa (from a cutting), but sadly no magnolia as yet.  This one, spotted in Eye growing out of a crack in the concrete, was a nice reminder of our 'lost' tree.           
Looks great with a double mount and a polished wood frame

Looks great with a double mount and a polished wood frame

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Suffolk
Suffolk     Britain     World     B&W     Abstract
Suffolk     Britain     World    B&W     Abstract     Poetic Licence