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Dunwich in winter has an air of solitude, of
time-frozen bleakness, that is best
appreciated in front of a roaring fire in a
crowded pub with a pint of Adnams, the
Sunday paper and a pie. This photograph of
the in-shore fishing boats on the beach has
been given an old-fashioned gum-
bichromate look from the 1930s, which used
a mixture of watercolour pigments, gum
arabic and ammonia on sized paper. As a
photography student, I never got round to any of these ancient techniques, but with digital
you can now get a rough approximation of the end result. Here I've kept the colouration
subtle, rather than unduly warm up this freezing day on the East Coast. Listen carefully
and you can all but hear the opening bars of Britten's 'Sea Interludes' from 'Peter Grimes'.
I once shot a film for a BBC producer on 'The Herring and its Influence on European
History', being attracted as much by the title as anything else. One sequence was shot with
me hanging over the side of a Lowestoft trawler in the North Sea holding an £80,000
broadcast camera, secured only by the sound-recordist holding onto my belt while the
producer held onto him. The crew hauled in the net by hand, with not a single fish in it, let
alone a herring. It was a scene straight out of a gritty Michael Grigsby documentary from
the 1960s when the North Sea fishing industry was already in decline. It's a wonder
anybody now catches anything at Dunwich, apart from pneumonia.
Dunwich in winter has an air of solitude, of time-frozen bleakness, that is best
appreciated in front of a roaring fire in a crowded pub with a pint of Adnams, the Sunday
paper and a pie. This photograph of the in-shore fishing boats on the beach has been
given an old-fashioned gum- bichromate look from the 1930s, which used a mixture of
watercolour pigments, gum arabic and ammonia on sized paper. As a photography
student, I never got round to any of these ancient techniques, but with digital you can
now get a rough approximation of the end result. Here I've kept the colouration subtle,
rather than unduly warm up this freezing day on the East Coast. Listen carefully and you
can all but hear the opening bars of Britten's 'Sea Interludes' from 'Peter Grimes'.
I once shot a film for a BBC producer on 'The Herring and its Influence on European
History', being attracted as much by the title as anything else. One sequence was shot
with me hanging over the side of a Lowestoft trawler in the North Sea holding an
£80,000 broadcast camera, secured only by the sound-recordist holding onto my belt
while the producer held onto him. The crew hauled in the net by hand, with not a single
fish in it, let alone a herring. It was a scene straight out of a gritty Michael Grigsby
documentary from the 1960s when the North Sea fishing industry was already in decline.
It's a wonder anybody now catches anything at Dunwich, apart from pneumonia.
Dunwich in winter has an air of solitude,
of time-frozen bleakness, that is best
appreciated in front of a roaring fire in a
crowded pub with a pint of Adnams, the
Sunday paper and a pie. This photograph
of the in-shore fishing boats on the beach
has been given an old-fashioned gum-
bichromate look from the 1930s, which
used a mixture of watercolour pigments,
gum arabic and ammonia on sized paper.
As a photography student, I never got round to any of these ancient techniques, but with
digital you can now get a rough approximation of the end result. Here I've kept the
colouration subtle, rather than unduly warm up this freezing day on the East Coast.
Listen carefully and you can all but hear the opening bars of Britten's 'Sea Interludes'
from 'Peter Grimes'.
I once shot a film for a BBC producer on 'The Herring and its Influence on European
History', being attracted as much by the title as anything else. One sequence was shot
with me hanging over the side of a Lowestoft trawler in the North Sea holding an
£80,000 broadcast camera, secured only by the sound-recordist holding onto my belt
while the producer held onto him. The crew hauled in the net by hand, with not a single
fish in it, let alone a herring. It was a scene straight out of a gritty Michael Grigsby
documentary from the 1960s when the North Sea fishing industry was already in decline.
It's a wonder anybody now catches anything at Dunwich, apart from pneumonia.

Dunwich scene

Dunwich in winter has an air of solitude, of time-frozen bleakness, that is best appreciated in front of a roaring fire in a crowded pub with a pint of Adnams, the Sunday paper and a pie.  This photograph of the in-shore fishing boats on the beach has been given an old-fashioned gum- bichromate look from the 1930s, which used a mixture of watercolour pigments, gum arabic and ammonia on sized paper.  As a photography student, I never got round to any of these ancient techniques, but with digital you can now get a rough approximation of the end result.  Here I've kept the colouration subtle, rather than unduly warm up this freezing day on the East Coast.  Listen carefully and you can all but hear the opening bars of Britten's 'Sea Interludes' from 'Peter Grimes'.

I once shot a film for a BBC producer on 'The Herring and its Influence on European History', being attracted as much by the title as anything else. One sequence was shot with me hanging over the side of a Lowestoft trawler in the North Sea holding an £80,000 broadcast camera, secured only by the sound-recordist holding onto my belt while the producer held onto him.  The crew hauled in the net by hand, with not a single fish in it, let alone a herring.  It was a scene straight out of a gritty Michael Grigsby documentary from the 1960s when the North Sea fishing industry was already in decline.  It's a wonder anybody now catches anything at Dunwich, apart from pneumonia.
  
Conside a wider double-mount using a tone from the image

Conside a wider double-mount using a tone from the image

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