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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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I thnk these doorways, half way up an
exterior wall above a make-shift
market in Bazaar Street, Kochi (the old
spice trading centre of Old Cochin),
allow the upper-floor workshops inside
to have their goods delivered by lorry
straight onto the shop floor, and
probably despatched the same way.
Either that or it's a design quirk (in
India an equally plausible idea), but
either way the vibrant colours - not just here but throughout India - are a panacea to
one habituated to the dun colour of much of the Indian sub-continent's interior. Even
so, there is more colour in India per square metre than in a Dulux paint factory:
festivals and fireworks at the drop of a hat, women's sari's, the gaudy colours of
India's religious paintings, temples and iconography, hand-painted trucks, cotton
materials - colour everywhere. Except from the air, where India still looks dun.
I thnk these doorways, half way up an exterior wall above a make-shift market in Bazaar
Street, Kochi (the old spice trading centre of Old Cochin), allow the upper-floor
workshops inside to have their goods delivered by lorry straight onto the shop floor, and
probably despatched the same way. Either that or it's a design quirk (in India an equally
plausible idea), but either way the vibrant colours - not just here but throughout India -
are a panacea to one habituated to the dun colour of much of the Indian sub-continent's
interior. Even so, there is more colour in India per square metre than in a Dulux paint
factory: festivals and fireworks at the drop of a hat, women's sari's, the gaudy colours of
India's religious paintings, temples and iconography, hand-painted trucks, cotton
materials - colour everywhere. Except from the air, where India still looks dun.
I thnk these doorways, half way up an
exterior wall above a make-shift
market in Bazaar Street, Kochi (the old
spice trading centre of Old Cochin),
allow the upper-floor workshops inside
to have their goods delivered by lorry
straight onto the shop floor, and
probably despatched the same way.
Either that or it's a design quirk (in
India an equally plausible idea), but
either way the vibrant colours - not just here but throughout India - are a panacea to
one habituated to the dun colour of much of the Indian sub-continent's interior. Even
so, there is more colour in India per square metre than in a Dulux paint factory:
festivals and fireworks at the drop of a hat, women's sari's, the gaudy colours of
India's religious paintings, temples and iconography, hand-painted trucks, cotton
materials - colour everywhere. Except from the air, where India still looks dun.

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I thnk these doorways, half way up an exterior wall above a make-shift market in Bazaar Street, Kochi (the old spice trading centre of Old Cochin), allow the upper-floor workshops inside to have their goods delivered by lorry straight onto the shop floor, and probably despatched the same way. Either that or it's a design quirk (in India an equally plausible idea), but either way the vibrant colours - not just here but throughout India - are a panacea to one habituated to the dun colour of much of the Indian sub-continent's interior. Even so, there is more colour in India per square metre than in a Dulux paint factory: festivals and fireworks at the drop of a hat, women's sari's, the gaudy colours of India's religious paintings, temples and iconography, hand-painted trucks, cotton materials - colour everywhere. Except from the air, where India still looks dun.     
Plain, unfussy, mount and black frame work best here.

Plain, unfussy, mount and black frame work best here.

World gallery
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