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The 'clap-board' house is not as common a sight
in Britain as it used to be, so it was nice to see
these old houses in Rye still sporting their
wooden rendering. Open any book of old
photographs of Britain's towns and cities and
you'll find such houses, but usually in a section
on those that have been pulled down long ago as
being 'slums' or simply for redevelopment, a
vast amount of which happened after the war.
Unfortunately, an awful lot of our more valuable
heritage went with them, leaving many towns
deprived of their charm. Clapboard housing
went the way of anything that could be
'improved' in the name of 'progress' (including
much that would otherwise have later been
listed) under the bulldozers of rampant
developers and short-sighted, or even scurrilous,
town planners. Yet it wasn't always the result of
bomb damage and subsequent clearance - most towns and many cities never felt the
impact of the Luftwaffe. But all seem to have felt the dead hand of the developer, such
that it is now often difficult to tell one town from another. Rye is, however, an
exception. Never having been a target for anybody except the smuggling fraternity, it's
kept its old-world charm and is all the more agreeable for it.
The 'clap-board' house is not as common a sight in Britain as it used to be, so it was
nice to see these old houses in Rye still sporting their wooden rendering. Open any book
of old photographs of Britain's towns and cities and you'll find such houses, but usually
in a section on those that have been pulled down long ago as being 'slums' or simply
for redevelopment, a vast amount of which happened after the war. Unfortunately, an
awful lot of our more valuable heritage went with them, leaving many towns deprived
of their charm. Clapboard housing went the way of anything that could be 'improved'
in the name of 'progress' (including much that would otherwise have later been listed)
under the bulldozers of rampant developers and short-sighted, or even scurrilous, town
planners. Yet it wasn't always the result of bomb damage and subsequent clearance -
most towns and many cities never felt the impact of the Luftwaffe. But all seem to have
felt the dead hand of the developer, such that it is now often difficult to tell one town
from another. Rye is, however, an exception. Never having been a target for anybody
except the smuggling fraternity, it's kept its old-world charm and is all the more
agreeable for it.
The 'clap-board' house is not as common a sight in
Britain as it used to be, so it was nice to see these
old houses in Rye still sporting their wooden
rendering. Open any book of old photographs of
Britain's towns and cities and you'll find such
houses, but usually in a section on those that have
been pulled down long ago as being 'slums' or
simply for redevelopment, a vast amount of which
happened after the war. Unfortunately, an awful
lot of our more valuable heritage went with them,
leaving many towns deprived of their charm.
Clapboard housing went the way of anything that
could be 'improved' in the name of 'progress'
(including much that would otherwise have later
been listed) under the bulldozers of rampant
developers and short-sighted, or even scurrilous,
town planners. Yet it wasn't always the result of
bomb damage and subsequent clearance - most
towns and many cities never felt the impact of the Luftwaffe. But all seem to have felt the
dead hand of the developer, such that it is now often difficult to tell one town from
another. Rye is, however, an exception. Never having been a target for anybody except
the smuggling fraternity, it's kept its old-world charm and is all the more agreeable for it.

Clap-board house

The 'clap-board' house is not as common a sight in Britain as it used to be, so it was nice to see these old houses in Rye still sporting their wooden rendering. Open any book of old photographs of Britain's towns and cities and you'll find such houses, but usually in a section on those that have been pulled down long ago as being 'slums' or simply for redevelopment, a vast amount of which happened after the war.  Unfortunately, an awful lot of our more valuable heritage went with them, leaving many towns deprived of their charm.  Clapboard housing went the way of anything that could be 'improved' in the name of 'progress' (including much that would otherwise have later been listed) under the bulldozers of rampant developers and short-sighted, or even scurrilous, town planners. Yet it wasn't always the result of bomb damage and subsequent clearance - most towns and many cities never felt the impact of the Luftwaffe.  But all seem to have felt the dead hand of the developer, such that it is now often difficult to tell one town from another.  Rye is, however, an exception. Never having been a target for anybody except the smuggling fraternity, it's kept its old-world charm and is all the more agreeable for it.            
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