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We went to a lot of trouble in the UK after
the war to sweep away the old Britain and
replace it with the modern designs of the
new generation of wunderkind architects
who apparently knew what was best for
our towns and city-centres. Except that, for
the most part, they weren't very
wunderkind at all, and built dull concrete
accretions that passed for modern housing
and grim commercial centres that most of
us wanted the Luftwaffe have another go at. Whilst we were busy losing our Empire, it
seemed a good idea at the same time to update the old country itself, in the name of
progress. Lucky those communities that escaped first the bombs then the bulldozers of
post-war reconstruction, thereby in with a chance of saving their priceless heritage.
Betjeman railed against the loss of the nation's heartbeat to the philistine developer, but
he failed, ultimately, to halt the decline. Even today, we are still losing our quality of life to
an unspecified 'better' future with so-called 'improvement' programmes (like HS2!).
Which is why living in East Anglia is such a delight - no motorways, no rampant
development, few signs of industry, never a traffic jam that lasts longer than a Mars Bar...
Coming from a rich past, the area is stuffed with tudor houses, timber framed cottages,
ancient churches with hammerbeam roofs, and the sort of relaxed laissez-faire take on
life that allows a churchyard to become overgrown, a country lane to have wrong
directions, a pub to still have its original settles around the open fire and beer from the
taproom.
We went to a lot of trouble in the UK after the war to sweep away the old Britain and
replace it with the modern designs of the new generation of wunderkind architects who
apparently knew what was best for our towns and city-centres. Except that, for the most
part, they weren't very wunderkind at all, and built dull concrete accretions that passed
for modern housing and grim commercial centres that most of us wanted the Luftwaffe
have another go at. Whilst we were busy losing our Empire, it seemed a good idea at the
same time to update the old country itself, in the name of progress. Lucky those
communities that escaped first the bombs then the bulldozers of post-war
reconstruction, thereby in with a chance of saving their priceless heritage.
Betjeman railed against the loss of the nation's heartbeat to the philistine developer, but
he failed, ultimately, to halt the decline. Even today, we are still losing our quality of life
to an unspecified 'better' future with so-called 'improvement' programmes (like HS2!).
Which is why living in East Anglia is such a delight - no motorways, no rampant
development, few signs of industry, never a traffic jam that lasts longer than a Mars
Bar... Coming from a rich past, the area is stuffed with tudor houses, timber framed
cottages, ancient churches with hammerbeam roofs, and the sort of relaxed laissez-faire
take on life that allows a churchyard to become overgrown, a country lane to have
wrong directions, a pub to still have its original settles around the open fire and beer
from the taproom.
We went to a lot of trouble in the UK after
the war to sweep away the old Britain and
replace it with the modern designs of the
new generation of wunderkind architects
who apparently knew what was best for our
towns and city-centres. Except that, for the
most part, they weren't very wunderkind at
all, and built dull concrete accretions that
passed for modern housing and grim
commercial centres that most of us wanted
the Luftwaffe have another go at. Whilst we were busy losing our Empire, it seemed a good
idea at the same time to update the old country itself, in the name of progress. Lucky
those communities that escaped first the bombs then the bulldozers of post-war
reconstruction, thereby in with a chance of saving their priceless heritage.
Betjeman railed against the loss of the nation's heartbeat to the philistine developer, but
he failed, ultimately, to halt the decline. Even today, we are still losing our quality of life to
an unspecified 'better' future with so-called 'improvement' programmes (like HS2!). Which
is why living in East Anglia is such a delight - no motorways, no rampant development, few
signs of industry, never a traffic jam that lasts longer than a Mars Bar... Coming from a
rich past, the area is stuffed with tudor houses, timber framed cottages, ancient churches
with hammerbeam roofs, and the sort of relaxed laissez-faire take on life that allows a
churchyard to become overgrown, a country lane to have wrong directions, a pub to still
have its original settles around the open fire and beer from the taproom.

Ill met by moonlight

We went to a lot of trouble in the UK after the war to sweep away the old Britain and replace it with the modern designs of the new generation of wunderkind architects who apparently knew what was best for our towns and city-centres. Except that, for the most part, they weren't very wunderkind at all, and built dull concrete accretions that passed for modern housing and grim commercial centres that most of us wanted the Luftwaffe have another go at. Whilst we were busy losing our Empire, it seemed a good idea at the same time to update the old country itself, in the name of progress. Lucky those communities that escaped first the bombs then the bulldozers of post-war reconstruction, thereby in with a chance of saving their priceless heritage.

Betjeman railed against the loss of the nation's heartbeat to the philistine developer, but he failed, ultimately, to halt the decline. Even today, we are still losing our quality of life to an unspecified 'better' future with so-called 'improvement' programmes (like HS2!).  Which is why living in East Anglia is such a delight - no motorways, no rampant development, few signs of industry, never a traffic jam that lasts longer than a Mars Bar...  Coming from a rich past, the area is stuffed with tudor houses, timber framed cottages, ancient churches with hammerbeam roofs, and the sort of relaxed laissez-faire take on life that allows a churchyard to become overgrown, a country lane to have wrong directions, a pub to still have its original settles around the open fire and beer from the taproom.         
      
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