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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
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I'm not a particular fan of John Betjeman's
poetry, or of any poetry for that matter, except
for the heart rending verse that came out of
WW1. But having read a biography of him
recently I have to respect his passion for the
preservation of old England in his campaigns to
save buildings, railways, way of life, etc. and
his perseverance in bringing to public notice the
wanton destruction of town centres by greedy
developers and ignorant councillors. The bronze statue of him, which unfortunately
rather suggests the 'bumbling fool' aspect that his detractors claim is all there was,
stands on the forecourt of the newly rebuilt St. Pancras Station in London and celebrates
his contribution to the campaign to preserve this old station and hotel.
Everybody that I watched photographing his statue took the long-shot, or a close up of his
face, looking up in wonder at the spectacular ceiling. But I felt this opposite view says just
as much about the man, as he shuffles past me across the station concourse to catch the
5:10 from Platform 2. It also gets his dates in, which could be handy.
I'm not a particular fan of John Betjeman's poetry, or of any poetry for that matter,
except for the heart rending verse that came out of WW1. But having read a biography of
him recently I have to respect his passion for the preservation of old England in his
campaigns to save buildings, railways, way of life, etc. and his perseverance in bringing to
public notice the wanton destruction of town centres by greedy developers and ignorant
councillors. The bronze statue of him, which unfortunately rather suggests the 'bumbling
fool' aspect that his detractors claim is all there was, stands on the forecourt of the newly
rebuilt St. Pancras Station in London and celebrates his contribution to the campaign to
preserve this old station and hotel.
Everybody that I watched photographing his statue took the long-shot, or a close up of his
face, looking up in wonder at the spectacular ceiling. But I felt this opposite view says just
as much about the man, as he shuffles past me across the station concourse to catch the
5:10 from Platform 2. It also gets his dates in, which could be handy.
I'm not a particular fan of John Betjeman's
poetry, or of any poetry for that matter, except
for the heart rending verse that came out of
WW1. But having read a biography of him
recently I have to respect his passion for the
preservation of old England in his campaigns to
save buildings, railways, way of life, etc. and his
perseverance in bringing to public notice the
wanton destruction of town centres by greedy
developers and ignorant councillors. The bronze statue of him, which unfortunately rather
suggests the 'bumbling fool' aspect that his detractors claim is all there was, stands on the
forecourt of the newly rebuilt St. Pancras Station in London and celebrates his contribution
to the campaign to preserve this old station and hotel.
Everybody that I watched photographing his statue took the long-shot, or a close up of his
face, looking up in wonder at the spectacular ceiling. But I felt this opposite view says just
as much about the man, as he shuffles past me across the station concourse to catch the
5:10 from Platform 2. It also gets his dates in, which could be handy.

Betjeman at St Pancras

I'm not a particular fan of John Betjeman's poetry, or of any poetry for that matter, except for the heart rending verse that came out of WW1. But having read a biography of him recently I have to respect his passion for the preservation of old England in his campaigns to save buildings, railways, way of life, etc. and his perseverance in bringing to public notice the wanton destruction of town centres by greedy developers and ignorant councillors.  The bronze statue of him, which unfortunately rather suggests the 'bumbling fool' aspect that his detractors claim is all there was, stands on the forecourt of the newly rebuilt St. Pancras Station in London and celebrates his contribution to the campaign to preserve this old station and hotel. 

Everybody that I watched photographing his statue took the long-shot, or a close up of his face, looking up in wonder at the spectacular ceiling. But I felt this opposite view says just as much about the man, as he shuffles past me across the station concourse to catch the 5:10 from Platform 2.  It also gets his dates in, which could be handy.
For your own fine-art print of this picture:
I couldn't find a bronze frame that had gone green, so here's a brown 'bronze' one!

I couldn't find a bronze frame that had gone green, so here's a brown 'bronze' one!

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