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All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
All papers, inks and mount-board materials are of conservation grade.
Start engines... I confess that this picture
of a Boeing B-17G 'Flying Fortress', 'Sally
B', is wholly fabricated. Apart from the
aeroplane, that is. The new display hanger
at Imperial War Museum Duxford in
Cambridgeshire has this famous type
looking out, almost longingly, towards the
south-east, roughly in the direction of the
wartime Schweinfurt ball-bearing factory in
southern Germany. But by itself the
picture had no atmosphere. Taking Ansel Adams' "You don't take a picture, you make
it" to heart, I've done away with the hanger-sized windows, introduced a different sky
with a bomber's dawn lighting the horizon (the B-17s were engaged mainly on
daylight raids over Nazi Germany, while the RAF flew at night), and giving its
aluminium skin a golden glow from the early morning sun. It's not too fanciful to think
that this picture could've been taken in 1943, almost anywhere in SE England, though
not at this resolution and probably not in colour! The B17 was roughly the same size
as our Avro Lancaster, though with approximately half the bomb-load. Bristling with
defensive gunnery, and with long-range fighter escort from P-51 Mustangs, between
them the B-17s and the Lancs eventually destroyed the German ability to fight the
war in the air. Start engines...
Start engines... I confess that this picture of a Boeing B-17G 'Flying Fortress', 'Sally B', is
wholly fabricated. Apart from the aeroplane, that is. The new display hanger at Imperial
War Museum Duxford in Cambridgeshire has this famous type looking out, almost
longingly, towards the south-east, roughly in the direction of the wartime Schweinfurt
ball-bearing factory in southern Germany. But by itself the picture had no atmosphere.
Taking Ansel Adams' "You don't take a picture, you make it" to heart, I've done away with
the hanger-sized windows, introduced a different sky with a bomber's dawn lighting the
horizon (the B-17s were engaged mainly on daylight raids over Nazi Germany, while the
RAF flew at night), and giving its aluminium skin a golden glow from the early morning
sun. It's not too fanciful to think that this picture could've been taken in 1943, almost
anywhere in SE England, though not at this resolution and probably not in colour! The
B17 was roughly the same size as our Avro Lancaster, though with approximately half the
bomb-load. Bristling with defensive gunnery, and with long-range fighter escort from
P-51 Mustangs, between them the B-17s and the Lancs eventually destroyed the German
ability to fight the war in the air. Start engines...
Start engines... I confess that this picture of a
Boeing B-17G 'Flying Fortress', 'Sally B', is
wholly fabricated. Apart from the aeroplane,
that is. The new display hanger at Imperial
War Museum Duxford in Cambridgeshire has
this famous type looking out, almost longingly,
towards the south-east, roughly in the
direction of the wartime Schweinfurt
ball-bearing factory in southern Germany. But
by itself the picture had no atmosphere.
Taking Ansel Adams' "You don't take a picture, you make it" to heart, I've done away
with the hanger-sized windows, introduced a different sky with a bomber's dawn lighting
the horizon (the B-17s were engaged mainly on daylight raids over Nazi Germany, while
the RAF flew at night), and giving its aluminium skin a golden glow from the early
morning sun. It's not too fanciful to think that this picture could've been taken in 1943,
almost anywhere in SE England, though not at this resolution and probably not in colour!
The B17 was roughly the same size as our Avro Lancaster, though with approximately
half the bomb-load. Bristling with defensive gunnery, and with long-range fighter escort
from P-51 Mustangs, between them the B-17s and the Lancs eventually destroyed the
German ability to fight the war in the air. Start engines...
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See the 'Before and After' images
Start engines...  I confess that this picture of a Boeing B-17G 'Flying Fortress', 'Sally B', is wholly fabricated.  Apart from the aeroplane, that is. The new display hanger at Imperial War Museum Duxford in Cambridgeshire has this famous type looking out, almost longingly, towards the south-east, roughly in the direction of the wartime Schweinfurt ball-bearing factory in southern Germany. But by itself the picture had no atmosphere.  Taking Ansel Adams' "You don't take a picture, you make it" to heart, I've done away with the hanger-sized windows, introduced a different sky with a bomber's dawn lighting the horizon (the B-17s were engaged mainly on daylight raids over Nazi Germany, while the RAF flew at night), and giving its aluminium skin a golden glow from the early morning sun. It's not too fanciful to think that this picture could've been taken in 1943, almost anywhere in SE England, though not at this resolution and probably not in colour!  The B17 was roughly the same size as our Avro Lancaster, though with approximately half the bomb-load. Bristling with defensive gunnery, and with long-range fighter escort from P-51 Mustangs, between them the B-17s and the Lancs eventually destroyed the German ability to fight the war in the air.  Start engines...
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